Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612622
Title:
Blood Relations Senior Thesis Film
Author:
Castro, Gregory Alexander
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
WRITE WHAT YOU KNOW, UNLESS THAT’S BORING The common advice given to any budding filmmaker is to keep their work grounded in their own experiences. This is completely reasonable, and most often leads to higher quality, distinct student films. If students didn’t do this, then half of any given thesis filmmaking class would likely produce Lynch-ian knock-offs while the other half aped Spielberg. Occasionally, however, this filmmaking mantra “Write what you know,” needs to be tweaked, worked around. Sometimes, “What you know,” is actually somewhat common. As my granddad used to say to me, “You want to be a writer? You need to be creative for that. All you have to write about is petting your dog.” This may have been oversimplifying, but there was some truth at the heart of it. A twenty something white male from Overland Park, Kansas feels loneliness, disillusionment, jealousy, longing, angst. These feelings usually lend themselves to screenplays about surrogates for said white male ultimately finding love and an amazing sex life. Not exactly the stuff of Oscar winning short films. So write what you know, but maybe add a twist. My thesis is about loneliness, disillusionment, longing and grandfathers. It’s also about cannibalism.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.F.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Film Productions
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bricca, Jacob

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleBlood Relations Senior Thesis Filmen_US
dc.creatorCastro, Gregory Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorCastro, Gregory Alexanderen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractWRITE WHAT YOU KNOW, UNLESS THAT’S BORING The common advice given to any budding filmmaker is to keep their work grounded in their own experiences. This is completely reasonable, and most often leads to higher quality, distinct student films. If students didn’t do this, then half of any given thesis filmmaking class would likely produce Lynch-ian knock-offs while the other half aped Spielberg. Occasionally, however, this filmmaking mantra “Write what you know,” needs to be tweaked, worked around. Sometimes, “What you know,” is actually somewhat common. As my granddad used to say to me, “You want to be a writer? You need to be creative for that. All you have to write about is petting your dog.” This may have been oversimplifying, but there was some truth at the heart of it. A twenty something white male from Overland Park, Kansas feels loneliness, disillusionment, jealousy, longing, angst. These feelings usually lend themselves to screenplays about surrogates for said white male ultimately finding love and an amazing sex life. Not exactly the stuff of Oscar winning short films. So write what you know, but maybe add a twist. My thesis is about loneliness, disillusionment, longing and grandfathers. It’s also about cannibalism.en
dc.description.noteFilm can be viewed at this link: https://youtu.be/4JPeWFT6swsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.F.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineFilm Productionsen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorBricca, Jacoben
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