Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge: An Analysis of Impact on IDEIA, Part C Early Intervention Programs

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612613
Title:
Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge: An Analysis of Impact on IDEIA, Part C Early Intervention Programs
Author:
Bohjanen, Sharon Lynn
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Infants and toddlers who live in poverty are more likely to experience developmental delays or disabilities and less likely to access early intervention (EI) services. The federal initiative Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) was designed to increase access to high quality early learning programs for children at risk for developmental delays due to poverty or disability. Although IDEA, Part C programs were not specifically targeted by this initiative, policies associated with RTT-ELC may have an indirect impact on state EI programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of RTT-ELC on Part C programs by comparing states that received federal grants to states that did not. This study used a social justice framework to identify variables that inform equitable access to high quality Part C programs. Data were extracted from Part C state profiles and compared across states. Awarded states were more likely to increase enrollment of infants and toddlers in Part C Programs and were more likely to use broad eligibility criteria. These findings indicated that although differences were small they could become more pronounced over time. The need for policy change in Part C programs and federal early learning initiatives to directly target infants, toddlers and families in poverty are highlighted through the results of this study.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
early intervention; IDEIA; Part C Programs; quality early intervention; Social justice model for early intervention; Special Education; Access to early intervention
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Special Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Umbreit, John

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleRace to the Top-Early Learning Challenge: An Analysis of Impact on IDEIA, Part C Early Intervention Programsen_US
dc.creatorBohjanen, Sharon Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorBohjanen, Sharon Lynnen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractInfants and toddlers who live in poverty are more likely to experience developmental delays or disabilities and less likely to access early intervention (EI) services. The federal initiative Race to the Top-Early Learning Challenge (RTT-ELC) was designed to increase access to high quality early learning programs for children at risk for developmental delays due to poverty or disability. Although IDEA, Part C programs were not specifically targeted by this initiative, policies associated with RTT-ELC may have an indirect impact on state EI programs. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of RTT-ELC on Part C programs by comparing states that received federal grants to states that did not. This study used a social justice framework to identify variables that inform equitable access to high quality Part C programs. Data were extracted from Part C state profiles and compared across states. Awarded states were more likely to increase enrollment of infants and toddlers in Part C Programs and were more likely to use broad eligibility criteria. These findings indicated that although differences were small they could become more pronounced over time. The need for policy change in Part C programs and federal early learning initiatives to directly target infants, toddlers and families in poverty are highlighted through the results of this study.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectearly interventionen
dc.subjectIDEIAen
dc.subjectPart C Programsen
dc.subjectquality early interventionen
dc.subjectSocial justice model for early interventionen
dc.subjectSpecial Educationen
dc.subjectAccess to early interventionen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpecial Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorUmbreit, Johnen
dc.contributor.committeememberBricker, Dianeen
dc.contributor.committeememberAntia, Shirinen
dc.contributor.committeememberLevine-Donnerstein, Deborah L.en
dc.contributor.committeememberUmbreit, Johnen
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