The Acute Coronary Syndrome Experience among Native American Adults in Northern Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612608
Title:
The Acute Coronary Syndrome Experience among Native American Adults in Northern Arizona
Author:
Brice, Norria Marie
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Diseases of the heart have been the number one cause of death in the Native American population for decades and is an adverse health disparity for this population. Heart disease mortality rates are higher in Native Americans than in the U.S. population (American Heart Association, 2015; Veazie et al., 2014). The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) project is to describe the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) experience among Native American adults who reside in northern Arizona and diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction .A qualitative dominant mixed methods design (QUAL→quan) was used to describe the ACS symptom experience among this population. Data was collected from a convenience sample of nine Native American men residing on the Navajo and Hopi reservations in northern Arizona diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction. The qualitative portion of this study consisted of a semi-structured interview and the quantitative portion consisted of the completion of a demographic questionnaire and the McSweeney Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey. Qualitative description were used to analyze the data and develop codes, subcategories, categories and themes. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data from the demographic questionnaire and MAPMISS results. The findings in this study revealed the average age of the first heart attack for these participants was 58 years. The average time from symptom onset to hospital presentation was 7.4 hours. A common prodromal symptom was very tired/unusual fatigue. Common acute symptoms were chest pain, shortness of breath, gastrointestinal symptoms and diaphoresis. Neck/throat, generalized chest, and top of shoulders were most frequently reported areas of acute pain or discomfort. Influences to not seeking treatment included ignoring symptoms or thinking symptoms would go away. Influences to seeking treatment included worsening or non-resolution of symptoms. Accessing health care was difficult for almost all participants and contributed to treatment delay. Findings from this study gave new insight on ACS symptoms and the ACS experience of Native American men, reinforced current knowledge of the health disparities that exist in this population, and will assist in the development of culturally-sensitive, community-based education programs directed toward the Native American population.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
American Indian; heart disease; MI; Native American; Nursing; ACS
Degree Name:
D.N.P.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McEwen, Marylyn M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Acute Coronary Syndrome Experience among Native American Adults in Northern Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorBrice, Norria Marieen
dc.contributor.authorBrice, Norria Marieen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractDiseases of the heart have been the number one cause of death in the Native American population for decades and is an adverse health disparity for this population. Heart disease mortality rates are higher in Native Americans than in the U.S. population (American Heart Association, 2015; Veazie et al., 2014). The purpose of this Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) project is to describe the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) experience among Native American adults who reside in northern Arizona and diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction .A qualitative dominant mixed methods design (QUAL→quan) was used to describe the ACS symptom experience among this population. Data was collected from a convenience sample of nine Native American men residing on the Navajo and Hopi reservations in northern Arizona diagnosed with an acute myocardial infarction. The qualitative portion of this study consisted of a semi-structured interview and the quantitative portion consisted of the completion of a demographic questionnaire and the McSweeney Acute and Prodromal Myocardial Infarction Symptom Survey. Qualitative description were used to analyze the data and develop codes, subcategories, categories and themes. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data from the demographic questionnaire and MAPMISS results. The findings in this study revealed the average age of the first heart attack for these participants was 58 years. The average time from symptom onset to hospital presentation was 7.4 hours. A common prodromal symptom was very tired/unusual fatigue. Common acute symptoms were chest pain, shortness of breath, gastrointestinal symptoms and diaphoresis. Neck/throat, generalized chest, and top of shoulders were most frequently reported areas of acute pain or discomfort. Influences to not seeking treatment included ignoring symptoms or thinking symptoms would go away. Influences to seeking treatment included worsening or non-resolution of symptoms. Accessing health care was difficult for almost all participants and contributed to treatment delay. Findings from this study gave new insight on ACS symptoms and the ACS experience of Native American men, reinforced current knowledge of the health disparities that exist in this population, and will assist in the development of culturally-sensitive, community-based education programs directed toward the Native American population.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectAmerican Indianen
dc.subjectheart diseaseen
dc.subjectMIen
dc.subjectNative Americanen
dc.subjectNursingen
dc.subjectACSen
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorMcEwen, Marylyn M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberRosenfeld, Anne G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janice D.en
dc.contributor.committeememberMcEwen, Marylyn M.en
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