Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612594
Title:
USING MANCHESTER ENCODED DATA TRANSMISSION FOR ROV TELEMETRY
Author:
Mackey, Lawrence A.
Affiliation:
Undersea Vehicle Department
Issue Date:
1983-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
The communication link between the surface operator and an underwater Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) provides the critical function of monitoring and controlling the movements of the ROV. If the communication link is weak, the ability to operate the ROV is weak. The reliability of that communication link can be significantly improved by the use of Manchester coding in time division multiplex (TDM) data telemetry systems that provide a self-clocking method of data transmission. This method of data transmission is presently used on both military (MIL-STD-1553), and commercial aircraft supplying data communication between subsystems onboard. One important part of telemetry that this paper discusses is the various signals that must be telemetered between the surface and the ROV. The complexity of sending these signals varies with the type of signal and the requited quality/resolution required at the opposite end of the line. Also of importance is the media over which the data is being transmitted. Transmitting data up and down long umbilical cables is not unlike data transmission elsewhere, however there are subtle potential problem areas that most other systems are able to avoid. The possible methods of transmission range from using a twisted pair of wires, to the state of the art sophistication of fiber-optics. Each method has merits and pitfalls that the potential user must be aware of before trying to use them.
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleUSING MANCHESTER ENCODED DATA TRANSMISSION FOR ROV TELEMETRYen_US
dc.contributor.authorMackey, Lawrence A.en
dc.contributor.departmentUndersea Vehicle Departmenten
dc.date.issued1983-10-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractThe communication link between the surface operator and an underwater Remote Operated Vehicle (ROV) provides the critical function of monitoring and controlling the movements of the ROV. If the communication link is weak, the ability to operate the ROV is weak. The reliability of that communication link can be significantly improved by the use of Manchester coding in time division multiplex (TDM) data telemetry systems that provide a self-clocking method of data transmission. This method of data transmission is presently used on both military (MIL-STD-1553), and commercial aircraft supplying data communication between subsystems onboard. One important part of telemetry that this paper discusses is the various signals that must be telemetered between the surface and the ROV. The complexity of sending these signals varies with the type of signal and the requited quality/resolution required at the opposite end of the line. Also of importance is the media over which the data is being transmitted. Transmitting data up and down long umbilical cables is not unlike data transmission elsewhere, however there are subtle potential problem areas that most other systems are able to avoid. The possible methods of transmission range from using a twisted pair of wires, to the state of the art sophistication of fiber-optics. Each method has merits and pitfalls that the potential user must be aware of before trying to use them.en
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/612594-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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