REDUCING KENYA’S MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE: COMPARING MATERNAL MORTALITY DUE TO PRE-ECLAMPSIA IN KENYA AND THE U.S.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612565
Title:
REDUCING KENYA’S MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE: COMPARING MATERNAL MORTALITY DUE TO PRE-ECLAMPSIA IN KENYA AND THE U.S.
Author:
BAHL, PAULLUVI
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Previous studies show differences in maternal mortality rates (MMRs) between Kenya and the United States; for every American that dies from pre-eclampsia, 44 Kenyans die1. This literature review examines physiology, diagnosis, and management of pre-eclampsia, and external variables affecting these MMRs. A case study of a public hospital in Kenya is presented alongside healthcare worker interviews. External variables affecting patient care include clinical deficiencies and cultural factors. Clinical deficiencies include poor patient education on pre-natal care, insufficient physician education on proper detection of pre-eclampsia and management with magnesium sulfate. Cultural factors include women’s avoidance of pre-natal care, delivery with unskilled attendants outside of hospitals, and government corruption, which limits funding, staffing, and supplies. This thesis culminates in recommendations to alleviate these disparities and reduce Kenya’s MMR and a public education poster to be displayed in Kenya. Kenya’s high MMR can be reduced with better patient and physician education concerning merits of pre-natal care and hospital deliveries, symptoms of pre-eclampsia, management with magnesium sulfate, and adequate funding.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Physiology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Weinstein, Randi

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleREDUCING KENYA’S MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE: COMPARING MATERNAL MORTALITY DUE TO PRE-ECLAMPSIA IN KENYA AND THE U.S.en_US
dc.creatorBAHL, PAULLUVIen
dc.contributor.authorBAHL, PAULLUVIen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies show differences in maternal mortality rates (MMRs) between Kenya and the United States; for every American that dies from pre-eclampsia, 44 Kenyans die1. This literature review examines physiology, diagnosis, and management of pre-eclampsia, and external variables affecting these MMRs. A case study of a public hospital in Kenya is presented alongside healthcare worker interviews. External variables affecting patient care include clinical deficiencies and cultural factors. Clinical deficiencies include poor patient education on pre-natal care, insufficient physician education on proper detection of pre-eclampsia and management with magnesium sulfate. Cultural factors include women’s avoidance of pre-natal care, delivery with unskilled attendants outside of hospitals, and government corruption, which limits funding, staffing, and supplies. This thesis culminates in recommendations to alleviate these disparities and reduce Kenya’s MMR and a public education poster to be displayed in Kenya. Kenya’s high MMR can be reduced with better patient and physician education concerning merits of pre-natal care and hospital deliveries, symptoms of pre-eclampsia, management with magnesium sulfate, and adequate funding.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePhysiologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorWeinstein, Randien
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