The Life History Narrative: How Early Events and Psychological Processes Relate to Biodemographic Measures of Life History

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612536
Title:
The Life History Narrative: How Early Events and Psychological Processes Relate to Biodemographic Measures of Life History
Author:
Black, Candace Jasmine
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The aim of this project is to examine the relationships between two approaches to the measurement of life history strategies. The traditional method, termed here the biodemographic approach, measures developmental characteristics like birthweight, gestation length, inter-birth intervals, pubertal timing, and sexual debut. The alternative method under exploration, termed here the psychological approach, measures a suite of cognitive and behavioral traits such as altruism, sociosexual orientation, personality, mutualism, familial relationships, and religiosity. Although both approaches are supported by a large body of literature, they remain relatively segregated. This study draws inspiration from both views, integrating measures that assess developmental milestones, including birthweight, prematurity, pubertal timing, and onset of sexual behavior, as well as psychological life history measures such as the Mini-K and a personality inventory. Drawing on previous theoretical work on the fundamental dimensions of environmental risk, these measures are tested in conjunction with several scales assessing the stability of early environmental conditions, including both "event-based" measures that are defined with an external referent, and measures of internal schemata, or the predicted psychological sequelae of early events. The data are tested in a three-part sequence, beginning with the measurement models under investigation, proceeding to an exploratory analysis of the causal network, and finishing with a cross-validation of the structural model on a new sample. The findings point to exciting new directions for future researchers who seek to integrate the two perspectives.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Early Environment; Evolutionary Psychology; Life History Theory; Pubertal Timing; Sexual Health; Psychology; Child Development
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Figueredo, Aurelio José

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleThe Life History Narrative: How Early Events and Psychological Processes Relate to Biodemographic Measures of Life Historyen_US
dc.creatorBlack, Candace Jasmineen
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Candace Jasmineen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this project is to examine the relationships between two approaches to the measurement of life history strategies. The traditional method, termed here the biodemographic approach, measures developmental characteristics like birthweight, gestation length, inter-birth intervals, pubertal timing, and sexual debut. The alternative method under exploration, termed here the psychological approach, measures a suite of cognitive and behavioral traits such as altruism, sociosexual orientation, personality, mutualism, familial relationships, and religiosity. Although both approaches are supported by a large body of literature, they remain relatively segregated. This study draws inspiration from both views, integrating measures that assess developmental milestones, including birthweight, prematurity, pubertal timing, and onset of sexual behavior, as well as psychological life history measures such as the Mini-K and a personality inventory. Drawing on previous theoretical work on the fundamental dimensions of environmental risk, these measures are tested in conjunction with several scales assessing the stability of early environmental conditions, including both "event-based" measures that are defined with an external referent, and measures of internal schemata, or the predicted psychological sequelae of early events. The data are tested in a three-part sequence, beginning with the measurement models under investigation, proceeding to an exploratory analysis of the causal network, and finishing with a cross-validation of the structural model on a new sample. The findings point to exciting new directions for future researchers who seek to integrate the two perspectives.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectEarly Environmenten
dc.subjectEvolutionary Psychologyen
dc.subjectLife History Theoryen
dc.subjectPubertal Timingen
dc.subjectSexual Healthen
dc.subjectPsychologyen
dc.subjectChild Developmenten
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorFigueredo, Aurelio Joséen
dc.contributor.committeememberJacobs, W. Jakeen
dc.contributor.committeememberEllis, Bruce J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberSechrest, Leeen
dc.contributor.committeememberFigueredo, Aurelio Joséen
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