AMERICAN BEAUTY: A HISTORY IN ADVERTISMENTS AND PROPAGANDA, 1940-1945

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612476
Title:
AMERICAN BEAUTY: A HISTORY IN ADVERTISMENTS AND PROPAGANDA, 1940-1945
Author:
ADAMS, JAYNIE ELIZABETH
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This honors thesis explores the intersection between total war and American female beauty--namely, how advertisers and the War Board used the female image to not only garner support for the war, but to reinforce certain moral standards in a time where women found more personal freedom in their everyday lives. Additionally, advertisers used the war machine to promote their own beauty products, creating a direct link between true Americanism and cosmetics--lipstick, especially. The work is broken into three principal parts: a brief history of cosmetics use in the US, the development of the connection between female beauty and patriotic duty during the Second World War and, finally, an analysis of advertisements and propaganda using the lens of beauty and patriotism. It focuses largely on single, middle class, white women--the focus of many of this images--but I have included discussions of women othered by these images, and the impact these images had on those othered women.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.A.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Clancy-Smith, Julia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAMERICAN BEAUTY: A HISTORY IN ADVERTISMENTS AND PROPAGANDA, 1940-1945en_US
dc.creatorADAMS, JAYNIE ELIZABETHen
dc.contributor.authorADAMS, JAYNIE ELIZABETHen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThis honors thesis explores the intersection between total war and American female beauty--namely, how advertisers and the War Board used the female image to not only garner support for the war, but to reinforce certain moral standards in a time where women found more personal freedom in their everyday lives. Additionally, advertisers used the war machine to promote their own beauty products, creating a direct link between true Americanism and cosmetics--lipstick, especially. The work is broken into three principal parts: a brief history of cosmetics use in the US, the development of the connection between female beauty and patriotic duty during the Second World War and, finally, an analysis of advertisements and propaganda using the lens of beauty and patriotism. It focuses largely on single, middle class, white women--the focus of many of this images--but I have included discussions of women othered by these images, and the impact these images had on those othered women.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorClancy-Smith, Juliaen
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