Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612474
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF BACKGROUND MUSIC ON COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE
Author:
AHUJA, JASLEAN KAUR
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Multiple studies have indicated that performing cognitive tasks while listening to auditory stimuli, such as music, could possibly involve greater cognitive processing (Kiger,1989). However, while previous research has investigated the effects of music on comprehension reading, what studies lack are the effects different types of music may have on cognitive performance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of music that people prefer the most versus the least, and determine whether this enhances or diminishes their capabilities to perform reading comprehension tasks accurately and attentively under such back ground music. Twenty undergraduate students at the University of Arizona with normal hearing thresholds were recruited to perform reading comprehension tests under three particular conditions: no music, music they prefer, and music they have the least interest in. The hypothesis is that participants will have the easiest time performing the reading comprehension with no music, some trouble focusing with music they enjoy, and the greatest difficulty focusing when listening to music they do not enjoy.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
B.S.
Degree Level:
Bachelors
Degree Program:
Honors College; Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Velenovsky, David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF BACKGROUND MUSIC ON COGNITIVE PERFORMANCEen_US
dc.creatorAHUJA, JASLEAN KAURen
dc.contributor.authorAHUJA, JASLEAN KAURen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractMultiple studies have indicated that performing cognitive tasks while listening to auditory stimuli, such as music, could possibly involve greater cognitive processing (Kiger,1989). However, while previous research has investigated the effects of music on comprehension reading, what studies lack are the effects different types of music may have on cognitive performance. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of music that people prefer the most versus the least, and determine whether this enhances or diminishes their capabilities to perform reading comprehension tasks accurately and attentively under such back ground music. Twenty undergraduate students at the University of Arizona with normal hearing thresholds were recruited to perform reading comprehension tests under three particular conditions: no music, music they prefer, and music they have the least interest in. The hypothesis is that participants will have the easiest time performing the reading comprehension with no music, some trouble focusing with music they enjoy, and the greatest difficulty focusing when listening to music they do not enjoy.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
thesis.degree.nameB.S.en
thesis.degree.levelBachelorsen
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorVelenovsky, Daviden
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