A Qualitative Study of the Positioning of Emergent Bilinguals during Formal and Informal School-Based Interactions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612433
Title:
A Qualitative Study of the Positioning of Emergent Bilinguals during Formal and Informal School-Based Interactions
Author:
Sugimoto, Amanda Tori
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The education of emergent bilinguals in the United States is overtly and covertly shaped by social, political, and institutional ideologies about languages and speakers of languages other than English. Using a multiple case study design, this study sought to explicate the often-complicated intersection of outsider institutional and societal ideologies with the insider lived experiences of emergent bilinguals in schools. The population of the school under study uniquely positioned emergent bilinguals as not only the linguistic minority but also the numeric minority, a population dynamic notably underrepresented in the literature. Using a positioning theory framework that focused on the normative constraints that support meaning making during social interactions, this study explored how primarily monolingual English-speaking teachers and peers interactionally positioned three fourth grade emergent bilinguals, as well as how these emergent bilinguals reflexively positioned themselves. Data collection efforts consisted of multiphase observations of classrooms including the creating of sociograms and fieldnotes, interviews with emergent bilinguals, teachers, and key peers, as well as a localized artifact analysis. Findings suggested that the emergent bilinguals unique backgrounds contributed to their variable reflexive positioning, as well as teachers' variable interactional positioning. Additionally, peer positioning and institutional norms contributed to emergent bilinguals having limited access to academic language development opportunities.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Elementary education; English Language Learners; Equity; Language ideologies; Positioning theory; Teaching & Teacher Education; Access
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Teaching & Teacher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Carter, Kathy

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleA Qualitative Study of the Positioning of Emergent Bilinguals during Formal and Informal School-Based Interactionsen_US
dc.creatorSugimoto, Amanda Torien
dc.contributor.authorSugimoto, Amanda Torien
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractThe education of emergent bilinguals in the United States is overtly and covertly shaped by social, political, and institutional ideologies about languages and speakers of languages other than English. Using a multiple case study design, this study sought to explicate the often-complicated intersection of outsider institutional and societal ideologies with the insider lived experiences of emergent bilinguals in schools. The population of the school under study uniquely positioned emergent bilinguals as not only the linguistic minority but also the numeric minority, a population dynamic notably underrepresented in the literature. Using a positioning theory framework that focused on the normative constraints that support meaning making during social interactions, this study explored how primarily monolingual English-speaking teachers and peers interactionally positioned three fourth grade emergent bilinguals, as well as how these emergent bilinguals reflexively positioned themselves. Data collection efforts consisted of multiphase observations of classrooms including the creating of sociograms and fieldnotes, interviews with emergent bilinguals, teachers, and key peers, as well as a localized artifact analysis. Findings suggested that the emergent bilinguals unique backgrounds contributed to their variable reflexive positioning, as well as teachers' variable interactional positioning. Additionally, peer positioning and institutional norms contributed to emergent bilinguals having limited access to academic language development opportunities.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectElementary educationen
dc.subjectEnglish Language Learnersen
dc.subjectEquityen
dc.subjectLanguage ideologiesen
dc.subjectPositioning theoryen
dc.subjectTeaching & Teacher Educationen
dc.subjectAccessen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineTeaching & Teacher Educationen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorCarter, Kathyen
dc.contributor.committeememberTurner, Erinen
dc.contributor.committeememberCombs, Mary Carolen
dc.contributor.committeememberWyman, Leisyen
dc.contributor.committeememberCarter, Kathyen
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