Autoregenerative Laccase Cathodes: Fungi at the Food, Water, and Energy Nexus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612407
Title:
Autoregenerative Laccase Cathodes: Fungi at the Food, Water, and Energy Nexus
Author:
Evans, John Parker
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 23-May-2018
Abstract:
Today’s most pressing problems would greatly benefit from an integrated production method for food, water, and energy. Biological fuel cells can offer such a production method, but current designs cannot be scaled to meet global demand. The ability of five different fungal strains to secrete laccase was evaluated under optimized culture conditions using three inducers. A specialized electrode was developed to increase the loading of laccase on the cathode. Trametes versicolor was then immobilized at the modified cathode and shown to secrete electrochemically active laccase. This hybrid design combines the power density of an enzymatic catalyst with the robustness of a microbial catalyst by facilitating biological renewal of the enzymatic catalyst laccase.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Keywords:
cathode; induction; laccase; renewal; Trametes; Plant Pathology; bioelectrochemistry
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Plant Pathology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pryor, Barry M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAutoregenerative Laccase Cathodes: Fungi at the Food, Water, and Energy Nexusen_US
dc.creatorEvans, John Parkeren
dc.contributor.authorEvans, John Parkeren
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 23-May-2018en
dc.description.abstractToday’s most pressing problems would greatly benefit from an integrated production method for food, water, and energy. Biological fuel cells can offer such a production method, but current designs cannot be scaled to meet global demand. The ability of five different fungal strains to secrete laccase was evaluated under optimized culture conditions using three inducers. A specialized electrode was developed to increase the loading of laccase on the cathode. Trametes versicolor was then immobilized at the modified cathode and shown to secrete electrochemically active laccase. This hybrid design combines the power density of an enzymatic catalyst with the robustness of a microbial catalyst by facilitating biological renewal of the enzymatic catalyst laccase.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen
dc.subjectcathodeen
dc.subjectinductionen
dc.subjectlaccaseen
dc.subjectrenewalen
dc.subjectTrametesen
dc.subjectPlant Pathologyen
dc.subjectbioelectrochemistryen
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Pathologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPryor, Barry M.en
dc.contributor.committeememberOrbach, Marc J.en
dc.contributor.committeememberGervasio, Dominic F.en
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