Infrastructure and Informality: Contesting the Neoliberal Politics of Participation and Belonging in Cape Town, South Africa

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/612372
Title:
Infrastructure and Informality: Contesting the Neoliberal Politics of Participation and Belonging in Cape Town, South Africa
Author:
Storey, Angela Diane
Issue Date:
2016
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Embargo:
Release after 12-Apr-2021
Abstract:
This dissertation examines the production of an everyday politics of infrastructure within informal settlements in the Khayelitsha area of Cape Town, South Africa. As residents attempt to meet water, sanitation, and electricity needs through assemblages of informal service connections, in addition to limited formal services provided by the municipality, their material exclusions are articulated as evidence of persistent political marginality. Residents engage in multiple modes of politicized action seeking expansion to formal infrastructure and full inclusion in the promises of citizenship. However, they also face an array of complications created by municipal reliance upon neoliberal policies, practices, and logics. Despite a nominal emphasis on participatory processes of governance and development, municipal approaches to service provision and community engagement produce further marginalization. In order to theorize the intersection of neoliberal urban governance and democratic practice, this dissertation examines participation as the result of complex interactions between everyday experience, urban governance, circulating moral logics, and the work of civil society. The realm of politics emerges as one unbound by parties, NGOs, or social movements; instead, it is read dialectically both into and from the landscape of informality. Across three articles, this dissertation examines participation as a contested terrain of politicized action, shaped by neoliberal practices of governance, post-colonial tensions, and uneven social acknowledgement of experience, knowledge, and action.
Type:
text; Electronic Dissertation
Keywords:
Infrastructure; Neoliberalism; Participation; Social Movements; South Africa; Anthropology; Informal settlements
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Park, Thomas K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleInfrastructure and Informality: Contesting the Neoliberal Politics of Participation and Belonging in Cape Town, South Africaen_US
dc.creatorStorey, Angela Dianeen
dc.contributor.authorStorey, Angela Dianeen
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.releaseRelease after 12-Apr-2021en
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines the production of an everyday politics of infrastructure within informal settlements in the Khayelitsha area of Cape Town, South Africa. As residents attempt to meet water, sanitation, and electricity needs through assemblages of informal service connections, in addition to limited formal services provided by the municipality, their material exclusions are articulated as evidence of persistent political marginality. Residents engage in multiple modes of politicized action seeking expansion to formal infrastructure and full inclusion in the promises of citizenship. However, they also face an array of complications created by municipal reliance upon neoliberal policies, practices, and logics. Despite a nominal emphasis on participatory processes of governance and development, municipal approaches to service provision and community engagement produce further marginalization. In order to theorize the intersection of neoliberal urban governance and democratic practice, this dissertation examines participation as the result of complex interactions between everyday experience, urban governance, circulating moral logics, and the work of civil society. The realm of politics emerges as one unbound by parties, NGOs, or social movements; instead, it is read dialectically both into and from the landscape of informality. Across three articles, this dissertation examines participation as a contested terrain of politicized action, shaped by neoliberal practices of governance, post-colonial tensions, and uneven social acknowledgement of experience, knowledge, and action.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeElectronic Dissertationen
dc.subjectInfrastructureen
dc.subjectNeoliberalismen
dc.subjectParticipationen
dc.subjectSocial Movementsen
dc.subjectSouth Africaen
dc.subjectAnthropologyen
dc.subjectInformal settlementsen
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.advisorPark, Thomas K.en
dc.contributor.committeememberShaw, Susanen
dc.contributor.committeememberGreenberg, Jamesen
dc.contributor.committeememberRoth-Gordon, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.committeememberPark, Thomas K.en
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