Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/611874
Title:
Aircraft Tracking of Underwater Vehicles Equipped with Optical Beacons
Author:
Casey, Thomas; Estes, Lee; Fain, Gilbert
Affiliation:
Naval Undersea Warefare Center Division
Issue Date:
1993-10
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
During shallow water exercises, the performance of acoustic tracking and telemetry systems is degraded by severe multipath interference. The feasibility of an optical source attached to the underwater vehicle (UV) and a tracking aircraft-based receiver was theoretically established. Supporting water absorption and surface interaction experiments were also performed. The limiting case was the tracking of an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV). The requirements of daylight operation, atmospheric visibility, limited space and weight, self-contained power, exercise duration, sample rate, optimum search area, robustness in varying scattering and sea states, non-cooperating (except for low-data-rate communications of information such as depth) source and receiver, and relative simplicity, lead to two optimum candidate systems. One system uses a commercially available 5 megawatt q switched and double laser diode pumped YAG laser operating at 532 nm and 1 Hz rep rates. The second system uses a pulsed (2 μsec) zenon flash tube. Both systems satisfy the robustness constraint by intentional beam spreading. A performance constraint of 10:1 signal to noon solar upwelling shot noise ratio was imposed. This constraint can be met for water depths of 10 and 5 absorption lengths, respectively, for the laser and incoherent systems. An optimum search diameter of approximately 700 meters (m) at an optimum aircraft elevation of 3,000 meters is calculated for both systems. The 4-inch diameter F/1 wide-angle light pulse detection system gates a 4-inch diameter F/1 intensified charged coupled device (CCD) imaging system that locates the light surface penetration point. Another candidate receiver that performs both functions is a positive sensitive photomultiplier tube with crossed wire anodes. A supporting night-time experiment has been designed and is under construction.
Keywords:
Underwater Tracking; Optical Beacons; Laser Beacons; Air-Water Tracking
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleAircraft Tracking of Underwater Vehicles Equipped with Optical Beaconsen_US
dc.contributor.authorCasey, Thomasen
dc.contributor.authorEstes, Leeen
dc.contributor.authorFain, Gilberten
dc.contributor.departmentNaval Undersea Warefare Center Divisionen
dc.date.issued1993-10-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractDuring shallow water exercises, the performance of acoustic tracking and telemetry systems is degraded by severe multipath interference. The feasibility of an optical source attached to the underwater vehicle (UV) and a tracking aircraft-based receiver was theoretically established. Supporting water absorption and surface interaction experiments were also performed. The limiting case was the tracking of an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV). The requirements of daylight operation, atmospheric visibility, limited space and weight, self-contained power, exercise duration, sample rate, optimum search area, robustness in varying scattering and sea states, non-cooperating (except for low-data-rate communications of information such as depth) source and receiver, and relative simplicity, lead to two optimum candidate systems. One system uses a commercially available 5 megawatt q switched and double laser diode pumped YAG laser operating at 532 nm and 1 Hz rep rates. The second system uses a pulsed (2 μsec) zenon flash tube. Both systems satisfy the robustness constraint by intentional beam spreading. A performance constraint of 10:1 signal to noon solar upwelling shot noise ratio was imposed. This constraint can be met for water depths of 10 and 5 absorption lengths, respectively, for the laser and incoherent systems. An optimum search diameter of approximately 700 meters (m) at an optimum aircraft elevation of 3,000 meters is calculated for both systems. The 4-inch diameter F/1 wide-angle light pulse detection system gates a 4-inch diameter F/1 intensified charged coupled device (CCD) imaging system that locates the light surface penetration point. Another candidate receiver that performs both functions is a positive sensitive photomultiplier tube with crossed wire anodes. A supporting night-time experiment has been designed and is under construction.en
dc.subjectUnderwater Trackingen
dc.subjectOptical Beaconsen
dc.subjectLaser Beaconsen
dc.subjectAir-Water Trackingen
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/611874-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.