Lessons Learned from Operating C/A-Code COTS GPS Receivers on Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites for Navigation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/611590
Title:
Lessons Learned from Operating C/A-Code COTS GPS Receivers on Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites for Navigation
Author:
Wiest, Terry; Nowitzky, Thomas E.; Grippando, Steven A.
Affiliation:
Space & Missile Systems Center; Loral Space & Range Systems
Issue Date:
1995-11
Rights:
Copyright © International Foundation for Telemetering
Collection Information:
Proceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Telemetering
Journal:
International Telemetering Conference Proceedings
Abstract:
Since June of 1993, an experimental GPS receiver system has been orbiting the earth aboard a small, low-altitude, polar-orbiting satellite called RADCAL. The purpose of the experiment was to prove the concept of using GPS for satellite navigation. If successful, the system would also provide a backup to the satellite's primary navigation beacon. The goal: provide position and velocity data to an accuracy of three to five meters, and provide attitude data to within a degree. The configuration of the RADCAL GPS experiment precluded realtime feedback loops for navigation; the data was stored and downloaded after a designated collection period. On the ground, a lengthy process was used to yield the position and attitude data days after the collection event. The GPS receivers and ground equipment were configured in several modes; they ultimately yielded a position accuracy of five meters, and attitude of two degrees. This was the original goal, and the experiment was considered successful. However, one of the receivers failed in November 1993, and the other failed in January 1995. The GPS receivers were commercially available and not spaceflight proven; they were suspected of being vulnerable to single-event upsets and latchups. This turned out to be the cause of the failure of both receivers. The interface between the GPS receivers and RADCAL's other subsystems proved to be the area which could not tolerate corrupt data. The single-event latchups problems would ultimately lead to the failure of the receivers. These difficulties, as well as other lesser obstacles, provide a host of lessons learned for future satellite navigation systems.
Keywords:
RADCAL; radar calibration; satellite; GPS; TSPI
Sponsors:
International Foundation for Telemetering
ISSN:
0884-5123; 0074-9079
Additional Links:
http://www.telemetry.org/

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleLessons Learned from Operating C/A-Code COTS GPS Receivers on Low-Earth Orbiting Satellites for Navigationen_US
dc.contributor.authorWiest, Terryen
dc.contributor.authorNowitzky, Thomas E.en
dc.contributor.authorGrippando, Steven A.en
dc.contributor.departmentSpace & Missile Systems Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentLoral Space & Range Systemsen
dc.date.issued1995-11-
dc.rightsCopyright © International Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.collectioninformationProceedings from the International Telemetering Conference are made available by the International Foundation for Telemetering and the University of Arizona Libraries. Visit http://www.telemetry.org/index.php/contact-us if you have questions about items in this collection.en
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.description.abstractSince June of 1993, an experimental GPS receiver system has been orbiting the earth aboard a small, low-altitude, polar-orbiting satellite called RADCAL. The purpose of the experiment was to prove the concept of using GPS for satellite navigation. If successful, the system would also provide a backup to the satellite's primary navigation beacon. The goal: provide position and velocity data to an accuracy of three to five meters, and provide attitude data to within a degree. The configuration of the RADCAL GPS experiment precluded realtime feedback loops for navigation; the data was stored and downloaded after a designated collection period. On the ground, a lengthy process was used to yield the position and attitude data days after the collection event. The GPS receivers and ground equipment were configured in several modes; they ultimately yielded a position accuracy of five meters, and attitude of two degrees. This was the original goal, and the experiment was considered successful. However, one of the receivers failed in November 1993, and the other failed in January 1995. The GPS receivers were commercially available and not spaceflight proven; they were suspected of being vulnerable to single-event upsets and latchups. This turned out to be the cause of the failure of both receivers. The interface between the GPS receivers and RADCAL's other subsystems proved to be the area which could not tolerate corrupt data. The single-event latchups problems would ultimately lead to the failure of the receivers. These difficulties, as well as other lesser obstacles, provide a host of lessons learned for future satellite navigation systems.en
dc.subjectRADCALen
dc.subjectradar calibrationen
dc.subjectsatelliteen
dc.subjectGPSen
dc.subjectTSPIen
dc.description.sponsorshipInternational Foundation for Telemeteringen
dc.identifier.issn0884-5123-
dc.identifier.issn0074-9079-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/611590-
dc.identifier.journalInternational Telemetering Conference Proceedingsen
dc.typetexten
dc.typeProceedingsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.telemetry.org/en
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