THE EXPERIENCE OF LATE-ONSET EPILEPSY AMONG TAIWANESE ADULTS: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610494
Title:
THE EXPERIENCE OF LATE-ONSET EPILEPSY AMONG TAIWANESE ADULTS: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDY
Author:
Kuo, Tzu-Lin
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Numerous researchers worldwide have reported on the dramatic increase in the prevalence of epilepsy among older people in the past few decades. In Taiwan, the incidence of epilepsy in the population of age 40 and older is 2.5 per 1,000 people. Compared to residents in western countries, Chinese generally hold more negative attitudes toward people with epilepsy. However, little research exists on how people with epilepsy view their disease within a Chinese cultural context. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of Taiwanese adults with late -onset epilepsy. Using descriptive research techniques, a qualitative study design, and content analysis of transcribed interviews, the author identified five thematic categories: (1) The name of epilepsy (cultural dimension); (2) epilepsy and me (personal dimension); (3) epilepsy as a family affair (family dimension); (4) to tell or not to tell (social network dimension); and (5) help seeking dimension. The study findings can be used to assist the efforts of nurses to provide culturally appropriate care for Chinese adults with late -onset epilepsy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Jones, Elaine G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.titleTHE EXPERIENCE OF LATE-ONSET EPILEPSY AMONG TAIWANESE ADULTS: A DESCRIPTIVE STUDYen_US
dc.creatorKuo, Tzu-Linen
dc.contributor.authorKuo, Tzu-Linen
dc.date.issued2003-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en
dc.description.abstractNumerous researchers worldwide have reported on the dramatic increase in the prevalence of epilepsy among older people in the past few decades. In Taiwan, the incidence of epilepsy in the population of age 40 and older is 2.5 per 1,000 people. Compared to residents in western countries, Chinese generally hold more negative attitudes toward people with epilepsy. However, little research exists on how people with epilepsy view their disease within a Chinese cultural context. Thus, the purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of Taiwanese adults with late -onset epilepsy. Using descriptive research techniques, a qualitative study design, and content analysis of transcribed interviews, the author identified five thematic categories: (1) The name of epilepsy (cultural dimension); (2) epilepsy and me (personal dimension); (3) epilepsy as a family affair (family dimension); (4) to tell or not to tell (social network dimension); and (5) help seeking dimension. The study findings can be used to assist the efforts of nurses to provide culturally appropriate care for Chinese adults with late -onset epilepsy.en
dc.typetexten
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en
thesis.degree.levelmastersen
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.chairJones, Elaine G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberJones, Elaine G.en
dc.contributor.committeememberCromwell, Sandraen
dc.contributor.committeememberCrist, Janiceen
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