Ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) length variation across the Drosophilinae (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610372
Title:
Ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) length variation across the Drosophilinae (Diptera: Drosophilidae)
Author:
Mateos, Mariana; Markow, Therese
Affiliation:
Center for Insect Science and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, BioSciences West 310, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
BMC Evolutionary Biology 2005, 5:46 doi:10.1186/1471-2148-5-46
Journal:
BMC Evolutionary Biology
Rights:
© 2005 Mateos and Markow; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:The intergenic spacer of the ribosomal genes in eukaryotes (IGS) contains duplications of the core transcription promoter. The number of these duplicated promoters, as measured by the IGS length, appears to be correlated with growth rate and development time in several distantly related taxa. In the present study, we examined IGS length variation across a number of species of Drosophila to determine the amount of variation in this trait across different evolutionary time scales. Furthermore, we compared the usefulness of two methods commonly used to determine IGS length: Southern Blot Hybridization (SB) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).RESULTS:Our results show broad variation in IGS length across the genus Drosophila, but closely related species had similar IGS lengths. Our results also suggest that PCR tends to underestimate the true IGS size when the size is greater than 5 kb, and that this degree of underestimation is greater as the IGS size increases.CONCLUSION:Broad variation in IGS length occurs across large evolutionary divergences in the subfamily Drosophilinae. Although average IGS length has been shown to evolve rapidly under artificial selection, closely related taxa generally have similar average IGS lengths. Our comparison of methods suggests that without previous knowledge of the DNA sequence of the IGS and flanking regions, both methods be used to accurately measure IGS length.
EISSN:
1471-2148
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2148-5-46
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/5/46

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMateos, Marianaen
dc.contributor.authorMarkow, Thereseen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:05:21Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:05:21Z-
dc.date.issued2005en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Evolutionary Biology 2005, 5:46 doi:10.1186/1471-2148-5-46en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2148-5-46en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610372-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:The intergenic spacer of the ribosomal genes in eukaryotes (IGS) contains duplications of the core transcription promoter. The number of these duplicated promoters, as measured by the IGS length, appears to be correlated with growth rate and development time in several distantly related taxa. In the present study, we examined IGS length variation across a number of species of Drosophila to determine the amount of variation in this trait across different evolutionary time scales. Furthermore, we compared the usefulness of two methods commonly used to determine IGS length: Southern Blot Hybridization (SB) and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR).RESULTS:Our results show broad variation in IGS length across the genus Drosophila, but closely related species had similar IGS lengths. Our results also suggest that PCR tends to underestimate the true IGS size when the size is greater than 5 kb, and that this degree of underestimation is greater as the IGS size increases.CONCLUSION:Broad variation in IGS length occurs across large evolutionary divergences in the subfamily Drosophilinae. Although average IGS length has been shown to evolve rapidly under artificial selection, closely related taxa generally have similar average IGS lengths. Our comparison of methods suggests that without previous knowledge of the DNA sequence of the IGS and flanking regions, both methods be used to accurately measure IGS length.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2148/5/46en
dc.rights© 2005 Mateos and Markow; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleRibosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) length variation across the Drosophilinae (Diptera: Drosophilidae)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2148en
dc.contributor.departmentCenter for Insect Science and Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, BioSciences West 310, Tucson, AZ 85721, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Evolutionary Biologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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