Joint effects of citrus peel use and black tea intake on the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610367
Title:
Joint effects of citrus peel use and black tea intake on the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the skin
Author:
Hakim, Iman; Harris, Robin
Affiliation:
University of Arizona College of Public Health and the Arizona Cancer Center, 1515 N Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
BMC Dermatology 2001, 1:3 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-5945/1/3
Journal:
BMC Dermatology
Rights:
© 2001 Hakim and Harris; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in any medium for any noncommercial purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Differences in tea drinking habits and/or citrus peel use are likely to vary by populations and could contribute to the inconsistencies found between studies comparing their consumption and cancer risk.METHODS:A population-based case-control study was used to evaluate the relationships between citrus peel use and black tea intake and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Moreover, we assessed the independent and interactive effects of citrus peel and black tea in the development of SCC.RESULTS:Hot and iced teas were consumed by 30.7% and 51.8% of the subjects, respectively. Peel consumption was reported by 34.5% of subjects. Controls were more likely than were cases to report citrus peel use (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67) and hot tea intake (OR = 0.79). After adjustment for hot and iced tea intake, the ORs associated with citrus peel use were 0.55 and 0.69, respectively, whereas the corresponding adjusted ORs for hot and iced tea intake after adjustment for citrus peel use were 0.87 and 1.22 respectively. Compared with those who did not consume hot black tea or citrus peel, the adjusted ORs associated with sole consumption of hot black tea or citrus peel were 0.60 and 0.30, respectively. Subjects who reported consumption of both hot black tea and citrus peel had a significant marked decrease (OR= 0.22; 95% CI = 0.10 - 0.51) risk of skin SCC.CONCLUSION:These results indicate that both citrus peel use and strong (hot) black tea have independent potential protective effects in relation to skin SCC.
EISSN:
1471-5945
DOI:
10.1186/1471-5945-1-3
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-5945/1/3

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHakim, Imanen
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Robinen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:05:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:05:15Z-
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Dermatology 2001, 1:3 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-5945/1/3en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-5945-1-3en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610367-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Differences in tea drinking habits and/or citrus peel use are likely to vary by populations and could contribute to the inconsistencies found between studies comparing their consumption and cancer risk.METHODS:A population-based case-control study was used to evaluate the relationships between citrus peel use and black tea intake and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Moreover, we assessed the independent and interactive effects of citrus peel and black tea in the development of SCC.RESULTS:Hot and iced teas were consumed by 30.7% and 51.8% of the subjects, respectively. Peel consumption was reported by 34.5% of subjects. Controls were more likely than were cases to report citrus peel use (odds ratio (OR) = 0.67) and hot tea intake (OR = 0.79). After adjustment for hot and iced tea intake, the ORs associated with citrus peel use were 0.55 and 0.69, respectively, whereas the corresponding adjusted ORs for hot and iced tea intake after adjustment for citrus peel use were 0.87 and 1.22 respectively. Compared with those who did not consume hot black tea or citrus peel, the adjusted ORs associated with sole consumption of hot black tea or citrus peel were 0.60 and 0.30, respectively. Subjects who reported consumption of both hot black tea and citrus peel had a significant marked decrease (OR= 0.22en
dc.description.abstract95% CI = 0.10 - 0.51) risk of skin SCC.CONCLUSION:These results indicate that both citrus peel use and strong (hot) black tea have independent potential protective effects in relation to skin SCC.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-5945/1/3en
dc.rights© 2001 Hakim and Harris; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Verbatim copying and redistribution of this article are permitted in any medium for any noncommercial purpose, provided this notice is preserved along with the article's original URL.en
dc.titleJoint effects of citrus peel use and black tea intake on the risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the skinen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-5945en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona College of Public Health and the Arizona Cancer Center, 1515 N Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Dermatologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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