Randomized trial of tapas acupressure technique for weight loss maintenance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610364
Title:
Randomized trial of tapas acupressure technique for weight loss maintenance
Author:
Elder, Charles; Gullion, Christina; DeBar, Lynn; Funk, Kristine; Lindberg, Nangel; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Meltesen, Gayle; Gallison, Cherri; Stevens, Victor
Affiliation:
Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, 3800 N. Interstate Ave., Portland, OR 97227, USA; University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; Healing Touch Acupuncture, Portland, OR, USA
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Elder et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2012, 12:19 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/12/19
Journal:
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Rights:
© 2012 Elder et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Obesity is an urgent public health problem, yet only a few clinical trials have systematically tested the efficacy of long-term weight-loss maintenance interventions. This randomized clinical trial tested the efficacy of a novel mind and body technique for weight-loss maintenance.METHODS:Participants were obese adults who had completed a six-month behavioral weight-loss program prior to randomization. Those who successfully lost weight were randomized into either an experimental weight-loss maintenance intervention, Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT(R)), or a control intervention comprised of social-support group meetings (SS) led by professional facilitators. TAT combines self-applied light pressure to specific acupressure points accompanied by a prescribed sequence of mental steps. Participants in both maintenance conditions attended eight group sessions over six months of active weight loss maintenance intervention, followed by an additional 6 months of no intervention. The main outcome measure was change in weight from the beginning of the weight loss maintenance intervention to 12 months later. Secondary outcomes were change in depression, stress, insomnia, and quality of life. We used analysis of covariance as the primary analysis method. Missing values were replaced using multiple imputation.RESULTS:Among 285 randomized participants, 79% were female, mean age was 56 (standard deviation (sd) = 11), mean BMI at randomization was 34 (sd = 5), and mean initial weight loss was 9.8 kg (sd = 5). In the primary outcome model, there was no significant difference in weight regain between the two arms (1.72 kg (se 0.85) weight regain for TAT and 2.96 kg (se 0.96) weight regain for SS, p < 0.097) Tests of between- arm differences for secondary outcomes were also not significant. A secondary analysis showed a significant interaction between treatment and initial weight loss (p < .036), with exploratory post hoc tests showing that greater initial weight loss was associated with more weight regain for SS but less weight regain for TAT.CONCLUSIONS:The primary analysis showed no significant difference in weight regain between TAT and SS, while secondary and post hoc analyses indicate direction for future research.TRIAL REGISTRATION:ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00526565
EISSN:
1472-6882
DOI:
10.1186/1472-6882-12-19
Keywords:
Obesity; Weight-loss maintenance; Energy medicine; Acupressure
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/12/19

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorElder, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorGullion, Christinaen
dc.contributor.authorDeBar, Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorFunk, Kristineen
dc.contributor.authorLindberg, Nangelen
dc.contributor.authorRitenbaugh, Cherylen
dc.contributor.authorMeltesen, Gayleen
dc.contributor.authorGallison, Cherrien
dc.contributor.authorStevens, Victoren
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:05:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:05:12Z-
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationElder et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2012, 12:19 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/12/19en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6882-12-19en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610364-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Obesity is an urgent public health problem, yet only a few clinical trials have systematically tested the efficacy of long-term weight-loss maintenance interventions. This randomized clinical trial tested the efficacy of a novel mind and body technique for weight-loss maintenance.METHODS:Participants were obese adults who had completed a six-month behavioral weight-loss program prior to randomization. Those who successfully lost weight were randomized into either an experimental weight-loss maintenance intervention, Tapas Acupressure Technique (TAT(R)), or a control intervention comprised of social-support group meetings (SS) led by professional facilitators. TAT combines self-applied light pressure to specific acupressure points accompanied by a prescribed sequence of mental steps. Participants in both maintenance conditions attended eight group sessions over six months of active weight loss maintenance intervention, followed by an additional 6 months of no intervention. The main outcome measure was change in weight from the beginning of the weight loss maintenance intervention to 12 months later. Secondary outcomes were change in depression, stress, insomnia, and quality of life. We used analysis of covariance as the primary analysis method. Missing values were replaced using multiple imputation.RESULTS:Among 285 randomized participants, 79% were female, mean age was 56 (standard deviation (sd) = 11), mean BMI at randomization was 34 (sd = 5), and mean initial weight loss was 9.8 kg (sd = 5). In the primary outcome model, there was no significant difference in weight regain between the two arms (1.72 kg (se 0.85) weight regain for TAT and 2.96 kg (se 0.96) weight regain for SS, p < 0.097) Tests of between- arm differences for secondary outcomes were also not significant. A secondary analysis showed a significant interaction between treatment and initial weight loss (p < .036), with exploratory post hoc tests showing that greater initial weight loss was associated with more weight regain for SS but less weight regain for TAT.CONCLUSIONS:The primary analysis showed no significant difference in weight regain between TAT and SS, while secondary and post hoc analyses indicate direction for future research.TRIAL REGISTRATION:ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00526565en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/12/19en
dc.rights© 2012 Elder et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectObesityen
dc.subjectWeight-loss maintenanceen
dc.subjectEnergy medicineen
dc.subjectAcupressureen
dc.titleRandomized trial of tapas acupressure technique for weight loss maintenanceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6882en
dc.contributor.departmentKaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, 3800 N. Interstate Ave., Portland, OR 97227, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentHealing Touch Acupuncture, Portland, OR, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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