Post-exposure treatment of Ebola virus using passive immunotherapy: proposal for a new strategy

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610335
Title:
Post-exposure treatment of Ebola virus using passive immunotherapy: proposal for a new strategy
Author:
Chippaux, J. P.; Boyer, L. V.; Alagon, A.
Affiliation:
UMR 216, Mother and Child Facing Tropical Disease, Research Institute for Development (IRD), Cotonou, Benin, and School of Pharmacy, Paris Descartes University; Venom Immunochemistry, Pharmacology and Emergency Response (VIPER) Institue, University of Arizona; Institute of Biotechnology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM); Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD)
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Chippaux et al. Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases (2015) 21:3 DOI 10.1186/s40409-015-0003-1
Journal:
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
Rights:
© 2015 Chippaux et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Better treatments are urgently needed for the management of Ebola virus epidemics in Equatorial Africa. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the use of passive immunotherapy for the treatment or prevention of Ebola virus disease. We placed findings from this review into the context of passive immunotherapy currently used for venom-induced disease, and recent improvements in manufacturing of polyvalent antivenom products. RESULTS: Passive immunotherapy appears to be one of the most promising specific treatments for Ebola. However, its potential has been incompletely evaluated, considering the overall experience and recent improvement of immunotherapy. Development and use of heterologous serum derivatives could protect people exposed to Ebola viruses with reasonable cost and logistics. CONCLUSION: Hyperimmune equine IgG fragments and purified polyclonal whole IgG deserve further consideration as treatment for exposure to the Ebola virus.
EISSN:
1678-9199
PubMed ID:
25705218
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4336475
DOI:
10.1186/s40409-015-0003-1 [doi]
Keywords:
Africa; Ebola; Epidemics; Immunotherapy; Prophylaxis
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.jvat.org/content/21/1/3

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChippaux, J. P.en
dc.contributor.authorBoyer, L. V.en
dc.contributor.authorAlagon, A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:04:32Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:04:32Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationChippaux et al. Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases (2015) 21:3 DOI 10.1186/s40409-015-0003-1en
dc.identifier.pmid25705218en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s40409-015-0003-1 [doi]en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610335-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Better treatments are urgently needed for the management of Ebola virus epidemics in Equatorial Africa. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the literature on the use of passive immunotherapy for the treatment or prevention of Ebola virus disease. We placed findings from this review into the context of passive immunotherapy currently used for venom-induced disease, and recent improvements in manufacturing of polyvalent antivenom products. RESULTS: Passive immunotherapy appears to be one of the most promising specific treatments for Ebola. However, its potential has been incompletely evaluated, considering the overall experience and recent improvement of immunotherapy. Development and use of heterologous serum derivatives could protect people exposed to Ebola viruses with reasonable cost and logistics. CONCLUSION: Hyperimmune equine IgG fragments and purified polyclonal whole IgG deserve further consideration as treatment for exposure to the Ebola virus.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.jvat.org/content/21/1/3en
dc.rights© 2015 Chippaux et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectEbolaen
dc.subjectEpidemicsen
dc.subjectImmunotherapyen
dc.subjectProphylaxisen
dc.titlePost-exposure treatment of Ebola virus using passive immunotherapy: proposal for a new strategyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1678-9199en
dc.contributor.departmentUMR 216, Mother and Child Facing Tropical Disease, Research Institute for Development (IRD), Cotonou, Benin, and School of Pharmacy, Paris Descartes Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentVenom Immunochemistry, Pharmacology and Emergency Response (VIPER) Institue, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Biotechnology, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)en
dc.contributor.departmentInstitut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseasesen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4336475en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

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