Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610330
Title:
Extensive retroviral diversity in shark
Author:
Han, G. Z.
Affiliation:
Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Microbes and Functional Genomics, Jiangsu Engineering and Technology Research Center for Microbiology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal University; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Han Retrovirology (2015) 12:34 DOI 10.1186/s12977-015-0158-4
Journal:
Retrovirology
Rights:
© 2015 Han; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Retroviruses infect a wide range of vertebrates. However, little is known about the diversity of retroviruses in basal vertebrates. Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) provides a valuable resource to study the ecology and evolution of retrovirus. FINDINGS: I performed a genome-scale screening for ERVs in the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) and identified three complete or nearly complete ERVs and many short ERV fragments. I designate these retroviral elements "C. milli ERVs" (CmiERVs). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the CmiERVs form three distinct lineages. The genome invasions by these retroviruses are estimated to take place more than 50 million years ago. CONCLUSIONS: My results reveal the extensive retroviral diversity in the elephant shark. Diverse retroviruses appear to have been associated with cartilaginous fishes for millions of years. These findings have important implications in understanding the diversity and evolution of retroviruses.
EISSN:
1742-4690
PubMed ID:
25927737
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4422223
DOI:
10.1186/s12977-015-0158-4 [doi]
Keywords:
Endogenous retroviruses; Chondrichthyes; Paleovirology
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.retrovirology.com/content/12/1/34

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHan, G. Z.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:04:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:04:22Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationHan Retrovirology (2015) 12:34 DOI 10.1186/s12977-015-0158-4en
dc.identifier.pmid25927737en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12977-015-0158-4 [doi]en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610330-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Retroviruses infect a wide range of vertebrates. However, little is known about the diversity of retroviruses in basal vertebrates. Endogenous retrovirus (ERV) provides a valuable resource to study the ecology and evolution of retrovirus. FINDINGS: I performed a genome-scale screening for ERVs in the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) and identified three complete or nearly complete ERVs and many short ERV fragments. I designate these retroviral elements "C. milli ERVs" (CmiERVs). Phylogenetic analysis shows that the CmiERVs form three distinct lineages. The genome invasions by these retroviruses are estimated to take place more than 50 million years ago. CONCLUSIONS: My results reveal the extensive retroviral diversity in the elephant shark. Diverse retroviruses appear to have been associated with cartilaginous fishes for millions of years. These findings have important implications in understanding the diversity and evolution of retroviruses.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.retrovirology.com/content/12/1/34en
dc.rights© 2015 Han; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectEndogenous retrovirusesen
dc.subjectChondrichthyesen
dc.subjectPaleovirologyen
dc.titleExtensive retroviral diversity in sharken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1742-4690en
dc.contributor.departmentJiangsu Key Laboratory for Microbes and Functional Genomics, Jiangsu Engineering and Technology Research Center for Microbiology, College of Life Sciences, Nanjing Normal Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalRetrovirologyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4422223en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

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