Population-based prevalence of malaria among pregnant women in Enugu State, Nigeria: the Healthy Beginning Initiative

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610325
Title:
Population-based prevalence of malaria among pregnant women in Enugu State, Nigeria: the Healthy Beginning Initiative
Author:
Gunn, Jayleen KL; Ehiri, John E.; Jacobs, Elizabeth T.; Ernst, Kacey C.; Pettygrove, Sydney; Kohler, Lindsay N.; Haenchen, Steven D.; Obiefune, Michael C.; Ezeanolue, Chinenye O.; Ogidi, Amaka G.; Ezeanolue, Echezona E.
Affiliation:
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona; Department of Health Promotion Sciences/Global Health Institute, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona; University of Arizona Cancer Center; Prevention, Education, Treatment, Training and Research-Global Solutions-PeTR-GS, Enugu; Healthy Sunrise Foundation; Global Health and Implementation Science Initiative, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Gunn et al. Malar J (2015) 14:438 DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0975-x
Journal:
Malaria Journal
Rights:
© 2015 Gunn et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/),
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Malaria adversely affects pregnant women and their fetuses or neonates. Estimates of the malaria burden in pregnant women based on health facilities often do not present a true picture of the problem due to the low proportion of women delivering at these facilities in malaria-endemic regions. METHODS: Data for this study were obtained from the Healthy Beginning Initiative using community-based sampling. Self-identified pregnant women between the ages of 17-45 years were recruited from churches in Enugu State, Nigeria. Malaria parasitaemia was classified as high and low based on the malaria plus system. RESULTS: Of the 2069 pregnant women for whom malaria parasitaemia levels were recorded, over 99 % tested positive for malaria parasitaemia, 62 % showed low parasitaemia and 38 % high parasitaemia. After controlling for confounding variables, odds for high parasitaemia were lower among those who had more people in the household (for every one person increase in a household, OR = 0.94, 95 % CI 0.89-0.99). CONCLUSION: Results of this study are consistent with hospital-based estimates of malaria during pregnancy in southeastern Nigeria. Based on the high prevalence of malaria parasitaemia in this sample, education on best practices to prevent malaria during pregnancy, and resources in support of these practices are urgently needed.
EISSN:
1475-2875
DOI:
10.1186/s12936-015-0975-x
Keywords:
Prevalence; Pregnancy; Malaria; Nigeria
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.malariajournal.com/content/14/1/438

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGunn, Jayleen KLen
dc.contributor.authorEhiri, John E.en
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, Elizabeth T.en
dc.contributor.authorErnst, Kacey C.en
dc.contributor.authorPettygrove, Sydneyen
dc.contributor.authorKohler, Lindsay N.en
dc.contributor.authorHaenchen, Steven D.en
dc.contributor.authorObiefune, Michael C.en
dc.contributor.authorEzeanolue, Chinenye O.en
dc.contributor.authorOgidi, Amaka G.en
dc.contributor.authorEzeanolue, Echezona E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:04:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:04:15Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationGunn et al. Malar J (2015) 14:438 DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0975-xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12936-015-0975-xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610325-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Malaria adversely affects pregnant women and their fetuses or neonates. Estimates of the malaria burden in pregnant women based on health facilities often do not present a true picture of the problem due to the low proportion of women delivering at these facilities in malaria-endemic regions. METHODS: Data for this study were obtained from the Healthy Beginning Initiative using community-based sampling. Self-identified pregnant women between the ages of 17-45 years were recruited from churches in Enugu State, Nigeria. Malaria parasitaemia was classified as high and low based on the malaria plus system. RESULTS: Of the 2069 pregnant women for whom malaria parasitaemia levels were recorded, over 99 % tested positive for malaria parasitaemia, 62 % showed low parasitaemia and 38 % high parasitaemia. After controlling for confounding variables, odds for high parasitaemia were lower among those who had more people in the household (for every one person increase in a household, OR = 0.94, 95 % CI 0.89-0.99). CONCLUSION: Results of this study are consistent with hospital-based estimates of malaria during pregnancy in southeastern Nigeria. Based on the high prevalence of malaria parasitaemia in this sample, education on best practices to prevent malaria during pregnancy, and resources in support of these practices are urgently needed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.malariajournal.com/content/14/1/438en
dc.rights© 2015 Gunn et al. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/),en
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectMalariaen
dc.subjectNigeriaen
dc.titlePopulation-based prevalence of malaria among pregnant women in Enugu State, Nigeria: the Healthy Beginning Initiativeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1475-2875en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Health Promotion Sciences/Global Health Institute, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona Cancer Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention, Education, Treatment, Training and Research-Global Solutions-PeTR-GS, Enuguen
dc.contributor.departmentHealthy Sunrise Foundationen
dc.contributor.departmentGlobal Health and Implementation Science Initiative, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevadaen
dc.identifier.journalMalaria Journalen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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