Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610312
Title:
Career perspective: Charles M Tipton
Author:
Tipton, C. M.
Affiliation:
Department of Physiology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Tipton Extreme Physiology & Medicine (2015) 4:6 DOI 10.1186/s13728-015-0024-y
Journal:
Extreme Physiology & Medicine
Rights:
© 2015 Tipton; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
This invited autobiographical article pertains to 52 years as an exercise physiologist of which 16 years were devoted to being an active emeriti. Although the career pathway was circuitous in nature, once resolved, it included preparation of future exercise physiologists; reducing the health hazards associated with the "making of weight" by scholastic wrestlers; using animals (rats and dogs) as the model system with a myriad of experimental procedure for obtaining insights and understandings of various exercise training mechanism in one-G environments, and in simulated muG environments. From the results, we have concluded that (a) inactivity, as represented by immobilization, is the most undesirable physiological state an animal should experience and (b) movement, as represented by training, will have an intrinsic adaptive influence on select biological tissues that, in some situations, can be independent of autonomic and hormonal influences.
EISSN:
2046-7648
PubMed ID:
25897396
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4403774
DOI:
10.1186/s13728-015-0024-y [doi]
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.extremephysiolmed.com/content/4/1/6

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTipton, C. M.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:03:56Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:03:56Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationTipton Extreme Physiology & Medicine (2015) 4:6 DOI 10.1186/s13728-015-0024-yen
dc.identifier.pmid25897396en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13728-015-0024-y [doi]en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610312-
dc.description.abstractThis invited autobiographical article pertains to 52 years as an exercise physiologist of which 16 years were devoted to being an active emeriti. Although the career pathway was circuitous in nature, once resolved, it included preparation of future exercise physiologists; reducing the health hazards associated with the "making of weight" by scholastic wrestlers; using animals (rats and dogs) as the model system with a myriad of experimental procedure for obtaining insights and understandings of various exercise training mechanism in one-G environments, and in simulated muG environments. From the results, we have concluded that (a) inactivity, as represented by immobilization, is the most undesirable physiological state an animal should experience and (b) movement, as represented by training, will have an intrinsic adaptive influence on select biological tissues that, in some situations, can be independent of autonomic and hormonal influences.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.extremephysiolmed.com/content/4/1/6en
dc.rights© 2015 Tipton; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.titleCareer perspective: Charles M Tiptonen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2046-7648en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Physiology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalExtreme Physiology & Medicineen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4403774en
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen

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