Predictors of microbial agents in dust and respiratory health in the Ecrhs

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610304
Title:
Predictors of microbial agents in dust and respiratory health in the Ecrhs
Author:
Tischer, Christina; Zock, Jan-Paul; Valkonen, Maria; Doekes, Gert; Guerra, Stefano; Heederik, Dick; Jarvis, Deborah; Norbäck, Dan; Olivieri, Mario; Sunyer, Jordi; Svanes, Cecilie; Täubel, Martin; Thiering, Elisabeth; Verlato, Giuseppe; Hyvärinen, Anne; Heinrich, Joachim
Affiliation:
Institute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, German Research Centre for Environmental Health; Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL); Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF); CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP); Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL); Living Environment and Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare; Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Division Environmental Epidemiology, Utrecht University; Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona; Respiratory Epidemiology and Public Health Group, Imperial College London; MRC-HPA Centre for Environment Health, King's College London; The Department of Medical Science, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University; Department of Occupational Medicine, University of Verona; IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute); Department of Occupational Medicine, Centre for International Health, University of Bergen and Haukeland University Hospital; Division of Metabolic Diseases and Nutritional Medicine, Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-University; Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Verona
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd
Citation:
Tischer et al. BMC Pulmonary Medicine (2015) 15:48 DOI 10.1186/s12890-015-0042-y
Journal:
BMC Pulmonary Medicine
Rights:
© 2015 Tischer et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Dampness and mould exposure have been repeatedly associated with respiratory health. However, less is known about the specific agents provoking or arresting health effects in adult populations. We aimed to assess predictors of microbial agents in mattress dust throughout Europe and to investigate associations between microbial exposures, home characteristics and respiratory health. METHODS: Seven different fungal and bacterial parameters were assessed in mattress dust from 956 adult ECRHS II participants in addition to interview based home characteristics. Associations between microbial parameters and the asthma score and lung function were examined using mixed negative binomial regression and linear mixed models, respectively. RESULTS: Indoor dampness and pet keeping were significant predictors for higher microbial agent concentrations in mattress dust. Current mould and condensation in the bedroom were significantly associated with lung function decline and current mould at home was positively associated with the asthma score. Higher concentrations of muramic acid were associated with higher mean ratios of the asthma score (aMR 1.37, 95%CI 1.17-1.61). There was no evidence for any association between fungal and bacterial components and lung function. CONCLUSION: Indoor dampness was associated with microbial levels in mattress dust which in turn was positively associated with asthma symptoms.
EISSN:
1471-2466
DOI:
10.1186/s12890-015-0042-y
Keywords:
Molds; Fungi; Microbials; Indoor Air; Asthma; Airways
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2466/15/48

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTischer, Christinaen
dc.contributor.authorZock, Jan-Paulen
dc.contributor.authorValkonen, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorDoekes, Gerten
dc.contributor.authorGuerra, Stefanoen
dc.contributor.authorHeederik, Dicken
dc.contributor.authorJarvis, Deborahen
dc.contributor.authorNorbäck, Danen
dc.contributor.authorOlivieri, Marioen
dc.contributor.authorSunyer, Jordien
dc.contributor.authorSvanes, Cecilieen
dc.contributor.authorTäubel, Martinen
dc.contributor.authorThiering, Elisabethen
dc.contributor.authorVerlato, Giuseppeen
dc.contributor.authorHyvärinen, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorHeinrich, Joachimen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:03:43Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:03:43Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationTischer et al. BMC Pulmonary Medicine (2015) 15:48 DOI 10.1186/s12890-015-0042-yen
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12890-015-0042-yen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610304-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Dampness and mould exposure have been repeatedly associated with respiratory health. However, less is known about the specific agents provoking or arresting health effects in adult populations. We aimed to assess predictors of microbial agents in mattress dust throughout Europe and to investigate associations between microbial exposures, home characteristics and respiratory health. METHODS: Seven different fungal and bacterial parameters were assessed in mattress dust from 956 adult ECRHS II participants in addition to interview based home characteristics. Associations between microbial parameters and the asthma score and lung function were examined using mixed negative binomial regression and linear mixed models, respectively. RESULTS: Indoor dampness and pet keeping were significant predictors for higher microbial agent concentrations in mattress dust. Current mould and condensation in the bedroom were significantly associated with lung function decline and current mould at home was positively associated with the asthma score. Higher concentrations of muramic acid were associated with higher mean ratios of the asthma score (aMR 1.37, 95%CI 1.17-1.61). There was no evidence for any association between fungal and bacterial components and lung function. CONCLUSION: Indoor dampness was associated with microbial levels in mattress dust which in turn was positively associated with asthma symptoms.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2466/15/48en
dc.rights© 2015 Tischer et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectMoldsen
dc.subjectFungien
dc.subjectMicrobialsen
dc.subjectIndoor Airen
dc.subjectAsthmaen
dc.subjectAirwaysen
dc.titlePredictors of microbial agents in dust and respiratory health in the Ecrhsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2466en
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute of Epidemiology I, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Ingolstädter Landstrasse 1, German Research Centre for Environmental Healthen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL)en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF)en
dc.contributor.departmentCIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP)en
dc.contributor.departmentNetherlands Institute for Health Services Research (NIVEL)en
dc.contributor.departmentLiving Environment and Health Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfareen
dc.contributor.departmentInstitute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Division Environmental Epidemiology, Utrecht Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentRespiratory Epidemiology and Public Health Group, Imperial College Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentMRC-HPA Centre for Environment Health, King's College Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Department of Medical Science, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Occupational Medicine, University of Veronaen
dc.contributor.departmentIMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Occupational Medicine, Centre for International Health, University of Bergen and Haukeland University Hospitalen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Metabolic Diseases and Nutritional Medicine, Dr von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentEpidemiology and Medical Statistics, University of Veronaen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Pulmonary Medicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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