Impact of male partner's awareness and support for contraceptives on female intent to use contraceptives in southeast Nigeria

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610299
Title:
Impact of male partner's awareness and support for contraceptives on female intent to use contraceptives in southeast Nigeria
Author:
Ezeanolue, Echezona E.; Iwelunmor, Juliet; Asaolu, Ibitola; Obiefune, Michael C.; Ezeanolue, Chinenye O.; Osuji, Alice; Ogidi, Amaka G.; Hunt, Aaron T.; Patel, Dina; Yang, Wei; Ehiri, John E.
Affiliation:
Global Health and Implementation Science Initiatives, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada; Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Department of Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona; Prevention, Education, Treatment, Training and Research-Global Solutions-PeTR-GS; Healthy Sunrise Foundation; School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd
Citation:
Ezeanolue et al. BMC Public Health (2015) 15:879 DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2216-1
Journal:
BMC Public Health
Rights:
© 2015 Ezeanolue et al. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Despite the growing body of evidence on use of modern contraceptives among women in sub-Saharan African countries, little is known about the broader context in which female decision-making concerning contraceptive use occurs, particularly the role of their male partners' awareness and support of modern contraceptives. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 2468 pregnant women and their male partners enrolled in the Healthy Beginning Initiative (HBI), an intervention to increase HIV testing among pregnant women in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. The aims of this study were to determine: 1) male partners' awareness of, and support for, female contraceptive methods, and 2) influence of male partners' contraceptive awareness and support on pregnant women's expressed desire to use contraception. We used logistic regression models to examine the association between male partners' awareness and support of modern contraceptives on their spouses' desire to use contraceptives. RESULTS: Men's awareness of, and support for, use of modern contraceptives were significantly associated with their female partners' desire to use contraception. A majority of the men who were aware of modern contraceptives (66.5 %) and those who supported their spouses' use of contraception (72.5 %) had partners who expressed a desire to use contraception. Men who were aware of female contraception were 3 times more likely to have spouses who desired to use contraception (AOR = 3.17, 95 % C.I: 2.70-3.75). In addition, men who showed support for their spouses' use of contraception were over 5 times more likely to have spouses who indicated a desire to use contraception (AOR = 5.76, 95 % C.I: 4.82-6.88). Living in a household of 5 or more people (AOR = 1.45, 95 % C.I: 1.23-1.72) and residing in an urban area (AOR = 0.81, 95 % C.I: 0.67-0.97) were also significantly associated with women's expressed desire to use modern contraception. CONCLUSION: Men's awareness of, and support for, use of modern contraceptives were markedly associated with their spouses' desire to use contraception. This underscores the need for men's involvement in programs that seek to address women's uptake of contraception in low and middle income countries.
EISSN:
1471-2458
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-015-2216-1
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/15/879

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorEzeanolue, Echezona E.en
dc.contributor.authorIwelunmor, Julieten
dc.contributor.authorAsaolu, Ibitolaen
dc.contributor.authorObiefune, Michael C.en
dc.contributor.authorEzeanolue, Chinenye O.en
dc.contributor.authorOsuji, Aliceen
dc.contributor.authorOgidi, Amaka G.en
dc.contributor.authorHunt, Aaron T.en
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Dinaen
dc.contributor.authorYang, Weien
dc.contributor.authorEhiri, John E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:03:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:03:36Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationEzeanolue et al. BMC Public Health (2015) 15:879 DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2216-1en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-015-2216-1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610299-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Despite the growing body of evidence on use of modern contraceptives among women in sub-Saharan African countries, little is known about the broader context in which female decision-making concerning contraceptive use occurs, particularly the role of their male partners' awareness and support of modern contraceptives. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 2468 pregnant women and their male partners enrolled in the Healthy Beginning Initiative (HBI), an intervention to increase HIV testing among pregnant women in Enugu, southeast Nigeria. The aims of this study were to determine: 1) male partners' awareness of, and support for, female contraceptive methods, and 2) influence of male partners' contraceptive awareness and support on pregnant women's expressed desire to use contraception. We used logistic regression models to examine the association between male partners' awareness and support of modern contraceptives on their spouses' desire to use contraceptives. RESULTS: Men's awareness of, and support for, use of modern contraceptives were significantly associated with their female partners' desire to use contraception. A majority of the men who were aware of modern contraceptives (66.5 %) and those who supported their spouses' use of contraception (72.5 %) had partners who expressed a desire to use contraception. Men who were aware of female contraception were 3 times more likely to have spouses who desired to use contraception (AOR = 3.17, 95 % C.I: 2.70-3.75). In addition, men who showed support for their spouses' use of contraception were over 5 times more likely to have spouses who indicated a desire to use contraception (AOR = 5.76, 95 % C.I: 4.82-6.88). Living in a household of 5 or more people (AOR = 1.45, 95 % C.I: 1.23-1.72) and residing in an urban area (AOR = 0.81, 95 % C.I: 0.67-0.97) were also significantly associated with women's expressed desire to use modern contraception. CONCLUSION: Men's awareness of, and support for, use of modern contraceptives were markedly associated with their spouses' desire to use contraception. This underscores the need for men's involvement in programs that seek to address women's uptake of contraception in low and middle income countries.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/15/879en
dc.rights© 2015 Ezeanolue et al. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)en
dc.titleImpact of male partner's awareness and support for contraceptives on female intent to use contraceptives in southeast Nigeriaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2458en
dc.contributor.departmentGlobal Health and Implementation Science Initiatives, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevadaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaignen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Health Promotion Sciences, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentPrevention, Education, Treatment, Training and Research-Global Solutions-PeTR-GSen
dc.contributor.departmentHealthy Sunrise Foundationen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevadaen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Public Healthen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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