Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610298
Title:
How a bird is an island
Author:
Lapoint, Richard; Whiteman, Noah
Affiliation:
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, 1041 E Lowell St, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Lapoint and Whiteman BMC Biology 2012, 10:53 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/53
Journal:
BMC Biology
Rights:
© 2012 Lapoint and Whiteman; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Replicate adaptive radiations occur when lineages repeatedly radiate and fill new but similar niches and converge phenotypically. While this is commonly seen in traditional island systems, it may also be present in host-parasite relationships, where hosts serve as islands. In a recent article in BMC Biology, Johnson and colleagues have produced the most extensive phylogeny of the avian lice (Ischnocera) to date, and find evidence for this pattern. This study opens the door to exploring adaptive radiations from a novel host-parasite perspective.See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/52 webcite
EISSN:
1741-7007
DOI:
10.1186/1741-7007-10-53
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/53

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLapoint, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorWhiteman, Noahen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:03:34Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:03:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationLapoint and Whiteman BMC Biology 2012, 10:53 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/53en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1741-7007-10-53en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610298-
dc.description.abstractReplicate adaptive radiations occur when lineages repeatedly radiate and fill new but similar niches and converge phenotypically. While this is commonly seen in traditional island systems, it may also be present in host-parasite relationships, where hosts serve as islands. In a recent article in BMC Biology, Johnson and colleagues have produced the most extensive phylogeny of the avian lice (Ischnocera) to date, and find evidence for this pattern. This study opens the door to exploring adaptive radiations from a novel host-parasite perspective.See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/52 webciteen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/10/53en
dc.rights© 2012 Lapoint and Whiteman; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleHow a bird is an islanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1741-7007en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, 1041 E Lowell St, Tucson, AZ 85721, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Biologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.