Microbiology of diabetic foot infections: from Louis Pasteur to 'crime scene investigation'

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610294
Title:
Microbiology of diabetic foot infections: from Louis Pasteur to 'crime scene investigation'
Author:
Spichler, Anne; Hurwitz, Bonnie L.; Armstrong, David G.; Lipsky, Benjamin A.
Affiliation:
Deparment of Medicine, University of Arizona Health Science Center; Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, University of Arizona; Department of Surgery, Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), University of Arizona Health Sciences Center; Service of Infectious Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Department of Medicine, University of Geneva; Division of Medical Sciences, Green Templeton College, University of Oxford
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd
Citation:
Spichler et al. BMC Medicine (2015) 13:2 DOI 10.1186/s12916-014-0232-0
Journal:
BMC Medicine
Rights:
© 2015 Spichler et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Were he alive today, would Louis Pasteur still champion culture methods he pioneered over 150 years ago for identifying bacterial pathogens? Or, might he suggest that new molecular techniques may prove a better way forward for quickly detecting the true microbial diversity of wounds? As modern clinicians faced with treating complex patients with diabetic foot infections (DFI), should we still request venerated and familiar culture and sensitivity methods, or is it time to ask for newer molecular tests, such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing? Or, are molecular techniques as yet too experimental, non-specific and expensive for current clinical use? While molecular techniques help us to identify more microorganisms from a DFI, can they tell us ‘who done it?', that is, which are the causative pathogens and which are merely colonizers? Furthermore, can molecular techniques provide clinically relevant, rapid information on the virulence of wound isolates and their antibiotic sensitivities? We herein review current knowledge on the microbiology of DFI, from standard culture methods to the current era of rapid and comprehensive ‘crime scene investigation' (CSI) techniques.
EISSN:
1741-7015
DOI:
10.1186/s12916-014-0232-0
Keywords:
Molecular diagnostics; Diabetic foot infection; Microbiology; Metagenomics; High-throughput sequencing
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/13/2

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSpichler, Anneen
dc.contributor.authorHurwitz, Bonnie L.en
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, David G.en
dc.contributor.authorLipsky, Benjamin A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:03:28Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:03:28Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationSpichler et al. BMC Medicine (2015) 13:2 DOI 10.1186/s12916-014-0232-0en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12916-014-0232-0en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610294-
dc.description.abstractWere he alive today, would Louis Pasteur still champion culture methods he pioneered over 150 years ago for identifying bacterial pathogens? Or, might he suggest that new molecular techniques may prove a better way forward for quickly detecting the true microbial diversity of wounds? As modern clinicians faced with treating complex patients with diabetic foot infections (DFI), should we still request venerated and familiar culture and sensitivity methods, or is it time to ask for newer molecular tests, such as 16S rRNA gene sequencing? Or, are molecular techniques as yet too experimental, non-specific and expensive for current clinical use? While molecular techniques help us to identify more microorganisms from a DFI, can they tell us ‘who done it?', that is, which are the causative pathogens and which are merely colonizers? Furthermore, can molecular techniques provide clinically relevant, rapid information on the virulence of wound isolates and their antibiotic sensitivities? We herein review current knowledge on the microbiology of DFI, from standard culture methods to the current era of rapid and comprehensive ‘crime scene investigation' (CSI) techniques.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/13/2en
dc.rights© 2015 Spichler et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectMolecular diagnosticsen
dc.subjectDiabetic foot infectionen
dc.subjectMicrobiologyen
dc.subjectMetagenomicsen
dc.subjectHigh-throughput sequencingen
dc.titleMicrobiology of diabetic foot infections: from Louis Pasteur to 'crime scene investigation'en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1741-7015en
dc.contributor.departmentDeparment of Medicine, University of Arizona Health Science Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, University of Arizonaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Southern Arizona Limb Salvage Alliance (SALSA), University of Arizona Health Sciences Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentService of Infectious Diseases, Geneva University Hospitals and Department of Medicine, University of Genevaen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Medical Sciences, Green Templeton College, University of Oxforden
dc.identifier.journalBMC Medicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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