The impact of cochlear implantation on cognition in older adults: a systematic review of clinical evidence

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610290
Title:
The impact of cochlear implantation on cognition in older adults: a systematic review of clinical evidence
Author:
Miller, Gina; Miller, Craig; Marrone, Nicole; Howe, Carol; Fain, Mindy; Jacob, Abraham
Affiliation:
The University of Arizona Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences; Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, The University of Arizona College of Medicine; Arizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona College of Medicine; The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Arizona Center on Aging; Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, The University of Arizona Ear Institute, The University of Arizona College of Medicine; The University of Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona Bio5 Institute
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd
Citation:
Miller et al. BMC Geriatrics (2015) 15:16 DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0014-3
Journal:
BMC Geriatrics
Rights:
© 2015 Miller et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Hearing loss is the third most prevalent chronic condition faced by older adults and has been linked to difficulties in speech perception, activities of daily living, and social interaction. Recent studies have suggested a correlation between severity of hearing loss and an individual's cognitive function; however, a causative link has yet to be established. One intervention option for management of the most severe to profound hearing loss in older adults is cochlear implantation. We performed a review to determine the status of the literature on the potential influence of cochlear implantation on cognition in the older adult population. METHODS: Over 3800 articles related to cochlear implants, cognition, and older adults were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study population including adults > 65 years, (2) intervention with cochlear implantation, and (3) cognition as the primary outcome measure of implantation. RESULTS: Out of 3,886 studies selected, 3 met inclusion criteria for the review. CONCLUSIONS: While many publications have shown that cochlear implants improve speech perception, social functioning, and overall quality of life, we found no studies in the English literature that have prospectively evaluated changes in cognitive function after implantation with modern cochlear implants in older adults. The state of the current literature reveals a need for further clinical research on the impact of cochlear implantation on cognition in older adults.
EISSN:
1471-2318
DOI:
10.1186/s12877-015-0014-3
Keywords:
Cognition; Cognitive decline; Cognitive impairment; Elderly; Elderly people; Hearing impairment; Hearing loss; Older people; Cochlear Implant
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2318/15/16

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Ginaen
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorMarrone, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorFain, Mindyen
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Abrahamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:03:22Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationMiller et al. BMC Geriatrics (2015) 15:16 DOI 10.1186/s12877-015-0014-3en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12877-015-0014-3en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610290-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Hearing loss is the third most prevalent chronic condition faced by older adults and has been linked to difficulties in speech perception, activities of daily living, and social interaction. Recent studies have suggested a correlation between severity of hearing loss and an individual's cognitive function; however, a causative link has yet to be established. One intervention option for management of the most severe to profound hearing loss in older adults is cochlear implantation. We performed a review to determine the status of the literature on the potential influence of cochlear implantation on cognition in the older adult population. METHODS: Over 3800 articles related to cochlear implants, cognition, and older adults were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) study population including adults > 65 years, (2) intervention with cochlear implantation, and (3) cognition as the primary outcome measure of implantation. RESULTS: Out of 3,886 studies selected, 3 met inclusion criteria for the review. CONCLUSIONS: While many publications have shown that cochlear implants improve speech perception, social functioning, and overall quality of life, we found no studies in the English literature that have prospectively evaluated changes in cognitive function after implantation with modern cochlear implants in older adults. The state of the current literature reveals a need for further clinical research on the impact of cochlear implantation on cognition in older adults.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2318/15/16en
dc.rights© 2015 Miller et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectCognitionen
dc.subjectCognitive declineen
dc.subjectCognitive impairmenten
dc.subjectElderlyen
dc.subjectElderly peopleen
dc.subjectHearing impairmenten
dc.subjectHearing lossen
dc.subjectOlder peopleen
dc.subjectCochlear Implanten
dc.titleThe impact of cochlear implantation on cognition in older adults: a systematic review of clinical evidenceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2318en
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciencesen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, The University of Arizona College of Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Health Sciences Library, University of Arizona College of Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona College of Medicine, Arizona Center on Agingen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, The University of Arizona Ear Institute, The University of Arizona College of Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentThe University of Arizona Cancer Center, The University of Arizona Bio5 Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Geriatricsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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