Intervention development for integration of conventional tobacco cessation interventions into routine CAM practice

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610279
Title:
Intervention development for integration of conventional tobacco cessation interventions into routine CAM practice
Author:
Muramoto, Myra L.; Matthews, Eva; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl K.; Nichter, Mark A.
Affiliation:
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine; School of Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd
Citation:
Muramoto et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015) 15:96 DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0604-9
Journal:
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Rights:
© 2015 Muramoto et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are an important and growing presence in health care systems worldwide. A central question is whether evidence-based behavior change interventions routinely employed in conventional health care could also be integrated into CAM practice to address public health priorities. Essential for successful integration are intervention approaches deemed acceptable and consistent with practice patterns and treatment approaches of different types of CAM practitioners - that is, they have context validity. Intervention development to ensure context validity was integral to Project CAM Reach (CAMR), a project examining the public health potential of tobacco cessation training for chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists (CAM practitioners). This paper describes formative research conducted to achieve this goal. METHODS: Intervention development, undertaken in three CAM disciplines (chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy), consisted of six iterative steps: 1) exploratory key informant interviews; 2) local CAM practitioner community survey; 3) existing tobacco cessation curriculum demonstration with CAM practitioners; 4) adapting/tailoring of existing curriculum; 5) external review of adaptations; 6) delivery of tailored curriculum to CAM practitioners with follow-up curriculum evaluation. RESULTS: CAM practitioners identified barriers and facilitators to addressing tobacco use with patients/clients and saw the relevance and acceptability of the intervention content. The intervention development process was attentive to their real world intervention concerns. Extensive intervention tailoring to the context of each CAM discipline was found unnecessary. Participants and advisors from all CAM disciplines embraced training content, deeming it to have broad relevance and application across the three CAM disciplines. All findings informed the final intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The participatory and iterative formative research process yielded an intervention with context validity in real-world CAM practices as it: 1) is patient/client-centered, emphasizing the practitioner's role in a healing relationship; 2) is responsive to the different contexts of CAM practitioners' work and patient/client relationships; 3) integrates relevant best practices from US Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guidelines on treating tobacco dependence; and 4) is suited to the range of healing philosophies, scopes of practice and practice patterns found in participating CAM practitioners. The full CAMR study to evaluate the impact of the CAMR intervention on CAM practitioners' clinical behavior is underway.
EISSN:
1472-6882
DOI:
10.1186/s12906-015-0604-9
Keywords:
Context validity; Intervention protocol; Curriculum development; Training; Interprofessional education; Tobacco cessation; Chiropractic; Acupuncture; Massage therapist; Community based participatory research
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/15/96

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMuramoto, Myra L.en
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorRitenbaugh, Cheryl K.en
dc.contributor.authorNichter, Mark A.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:03:01Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:03:01Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationMuramoto et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015) 15:96 DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0604-9en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12906-015-0604-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610279-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies are an important and growing presence in health care systems worldwide. A central question is whether evidence-based behavior change interventions routinely employed in conventional health care could also be integrated into CAM practice to address public health priorities. Essential for successful integration are intervention approaches deemed acceptable and consistent with practice patterns and treatment approaches of different types of CAM practitioners - that is, they have context validity. Intervention development to ensure context validity was integral to Project CAM Reach (CAMR), a project examining the public health potential of tobacco cessation training for chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists (CAM practitioners). This paper describes formative research conducted to achieve this goal. METHODS: Intervention development, undertaken in three CAM disciplines (chiropractic, acupuncture, massage therapy), consisted of six iterative steps: 1) exploratory key informant interviews; 2) local CAM practitioner community survey; 3) existing tobacco cessation curriculum demonstration with CAM practitioners; 4) adapting/tailoring of existing curriculum; 5) external review of adaptations; 6) delivery of tailored curriculum to CAM practitioners with follow-up curriculum evaluation. RESULTS: CAM practitioners identified barriers and facilitators to addressing tobacco use with patients/clients and saw the relevance and acceptability of the intervention content. The intervention development process was attentive to their real world intervention concerns. Extensive intervention tailoring to the context of each CAM discipline was found unnecessary. Participants and advisors from all CAM disciplines embraced training content, deeming it to have broad relevance and application across the three CAM disciplines. All findings informed the final intervention. CONCLUSIONS: The participatory and iterative formative research process yielded an intervention with context validity in real-world CAM practices as it: 1) is patient/client-centered, emphasizing the practitioner's role in a healing relationship; 2) is responsive to the different contexts of CAM practitioners' work and patient/client relationships; 3) integrates relevant best practices from US Public Health Service Clinical Practice Guidelines on treating tobacco dependence; and 4) is suited to the range of healing philosophies, scopes of practice and practice patterns found in participating CAM practitioners. The full CAMR study to evaluate the impact of the CAMR intervention on CAM practitioners' clinical behavior is underway.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/15/96en
dc.rights© 2015 Muramoto et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectContext validityen
dc.subjectIntervention protocolen
dc.subjectCurriculum developmenten
dc.subjectTrainingen
dc.subjectInterprofessional educationen
dc.subjectTobacco cessationen
dc.subjectChiropracticen
dc.subjectAcupunctureen
dc.subjectMassage therapisten
dc.subjectCommunity based participatory researchen
dc.titleIntervention development for integration of conventional tobacco cessation interventions into routine CAM practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6882en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Anthropology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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