Tobacco brief intervention training for chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage practitioners: protocol for the CAM reach study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610278
Title:
Tobacco brief intervention training for chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage practitioners: protocol for the CAM reach study
Author:
Muramoto, Myra L.; Howerter, Amy; Matthews, Eva; Ford-Floden, Lysbeth; Gordon, Judith; Nichter, Mark; Cunningham, James; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl
Affiliation:
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine; School of Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd
Citation:
Muramoto et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2014, 14:510 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/14/510
Journal:
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Rights:
© 2014 Muramoto et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Tobacco use remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. Effective tobacco cessation aids are widely available, yet underutilized. Tobacco cessation brief interventions (BIs) increase quit rates. However, BI training has focused on conventional medical providers, overlooking other health practitioners with regular contact with tobacco users. The 2007 National Health Interview Survey found that approximately 20% of those who use provider-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are tobacco users. Thus, CAM practitioners potentially represent a large, untapped community resource for promoting tobacco cessation and use of effective cessation aids. Existing BI training is not well suited for CAM practitioners' background and practice patterns, because it assumes a conventional biomedical foundation of knowledge and philosophical approaches to health, healing and the patient-practitioner relationship. There is a pressing need to develop and test the effectiveness of BI training that is both grounded in Public Health Service (PHS) Guidelines for tobacco dependence treatment and that is relevant and appropriate for CAM practitioners. METHODS/DESIGN: The CAM Reach (CAMR) intervention is a tobacco cessation BI training and office system intervention tailored specifically for chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists. The CAMR study utilizes a single group one-way crossover design to examine the CAMR intervention's impact on CAM practitioners' tobacco-related practice behaviors. Primary outcomes included CAM practitioners' self-reported conduct of tobacco use screening and BIs. Secondary outcomes include tobacco using patients' readiness to quit, quit attempts, use of guideline-based treatments, and quit rates and also non-tobacco-using patients' actions to help someone else quit. DISCUSSION: CAM practitioners provide care to significant numbers of tobacco users. Their practice patterns and philosophical approaches to health and healing are well suited for providing BIs. The CAMR study is examining the impact of the CAMR intervention on practitioners' tobacco-related practice behaviors, CAM patient behaviors, and documenting factors important to the conduct of practice-based research in real-world CAM practices.
EISSN:
1472-6882
DOI:
10.1186/1472-6882-14-510
Keywords:
Tobacco cessation; Brief intervention; Training; Communication; Acupuncture; Chiropractic; Massage therapy; System intervention; Longitudinal study; Qualitative study
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/14/510

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMuramoto, Myra L.en
dc.contributor.authorHowerter, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorFord-Floden, Lysbethen
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Judithen
dc.contributor.authorNichter, Marken
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorRitenbaugh, Cherylen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:02:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:02:57Z-
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationMuramoto et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine 2014, 14:510 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/14/510en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1472-6882-14-510en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610278-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Tobacco use remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the US. Effective tobacco cessation aids are widely available, yet underutilized. Tobacco cessation brief interventions (BIs) increase quit rates. However, BI training has focused on conventional medical providers, overlooking other health practitioners with regular contact with tobacco users. The 2007 National Health Interview Survey found that approximately 20% of those who use provider-based complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) are tobacco users. Thus, CAM practitioners potentially represent a large, untapped community resource for promoting tobacco cessation and use of effective cessation aids. Existing BI training is not well suited for CAM practitioners' background and practice patterns, because it assumes a conventional biomedical foundation of knowledge and philosophical approaches to health, healing and the patient-practitioner relationship. There is a pressing need to develop and test the effectiveness of BI training that is both grounded in Public Health Service (PHS) Guidelines for tobacco dependence treatment and that is relevant and appropriate for CAM practitioners. METHODS/DESIGN: The CAM Reach (CAMR) intervention is a tobacco cessation BI training and office system intervention tailored specifically for chiropractors, acupuncturists and massage therapists. The CAMR study utilizes a single group one-way crossover design to examine the CAMR intervention's impact on CAM practitioners' tobacco-related practice behaviors. Primary outcomes included CAM practitioners' self-reported conduct of tobacco use screening and BIs. Secondary outcomes include tobacco using patients' readiness to quit, quit attempts, use of guideline-based treatments, and quit rates and also non-tobacco-using patients' actions to help someone else quit. DISCUSSION: CAM practitioners provide care to significant numbers of tobacco users. Their practice patterns and philosophical approaches to health and healing are well suited for providing BIs. The CAMR study is examining the impact of the CAMR intervention on practitioners' tobacco-related practice behaviors, CAM patient behaviors, and documenting factors important to the conduct of practice-based research in real-world CAM practices.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/14/510en
dc.rights© 2014 Muramoto et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectTobacco cessationen
dc.subjectBrief interventionen
dc.subjectTrainingen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectAcupunctureen
dc.subjectChiropracticen
dc.subjectMassage therapyen
dc.subjectSystem interventionen
dc.subjectLongitudinal studyen
dc.subjectQualitative studyen
dc.titleTobacco brief intervention training for chiropractic, acupuncture, and massage practitioners: protocol for the CAM reach studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6882en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Anthropology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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