Considerations for practice-based research: a cross-sectional survey of chiropractic, acupuncture and massage practices

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610277
Title:
Considerations for practice-based research: a cross-sectional survey of chiropractic, acupuncture and massage practices
Author:
Floden, Lysbeth; Howerter, Amy; Matthews, Eva; Nichter, Mark; Cunningham, James K.; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl; Gordon, Judith S.; Muramoto, Myra L.
Affiliation:
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine; School of Anthropology, University of Arizona
Issue Date:
2015
Publisher:
BioMed Central Ltd
Citation:
Floden et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015) 15:140 DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0659-7
Journal:
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Rights:
© 2015 Floden et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has steadily increased globally over the past two decades and is increasingly playing a role in the healthcare system in the United States. CAM practice-based effectiveness research requires an understanding of the settings in which CAM practitioners provide services. This paper describes and quantifies practice environment characteristics for a cross-sectional sample of doctors of chiropractic (DCs), licensed acupuncturists (LAcs), and licensed massage therapists (LMTs) in the United States. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional telephone survey of DCs (n = 32), LAcs (n = 70), and LMTs (n = 184) in the Tucson, AZ metropolitan area, we collected data about each location where practitioners work, as well as measures on practitioner and practice characteristics including: patient volume, number of locations where practitioners worked, CAM practitioner types working at each location, and business models of practice. RESULTS: The majority of practitioners reported having one practice location (93.8% of DCs, 80% of LAcs and 59.8% of LMTs) where they treat patients. Patient volume/week was related to practitioner type; DCs saw 83.13 (SD = 49.29) patients/week, LAcs saw 22.29 (SD = 16.88) patients/week, and LMTs saw 14.21 (SD =10.25) patients per week. Practitioners completed surveys for N = 388 practice locations. Many CAM practices were found to be multidisciplinary and/or have more than one practitioner: 9/35 (25.7%) chiropractic practices, 24/87 (27.6%) acupuncture practices, and 141/266 (53.0%) massage practices. Practice business models across CAM practitioner types were heterogeneous, e.g. sole proprietor, employee, partner, and independent contractor. CONCLUSIONS: CAM practices vary across and within disciplines in ways that can significantly impact design and implementation of practice-based research. CAM research and intervention programs need to be mindful of the heterogeneity of CAM practices in order to create appropriate interventions, study designs, and implementation plans.
EISSN:
1472-6882
DOI:
10.1186/s12906-015-0659-7
Keywords:
Complementary and alternative medicine; Practitioners; Chiropractors; Acupuncturists; Massage therapists; Practice-based research; Practice patterns; Cross-sectional survey
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/15/140

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFloden, Lysbethen
dc.contributor.authorHowerter, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Evaen
dc.contributor.authorNichter, Marken
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, James K.en
dc.contributor.authorRitenbaugh, Cherylen
dc.contributor.authorGordon, Judith S.en
dc.contributor.authorMuramoto, Myra L.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:02:55Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:02:55Z-
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationFloden et al. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine (2015) 15:140 DOI 10.1186/s12906-015-0659-7en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12906-015-0659-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610277-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use has steadily increased globally over the past two decades and is increasingly playing a role in the healthcare system in the United States. CAM practice-based effectiveness research requires an understanding of the settings in which CAM practitioners provide services. This paper describes and quantifies practice environment characteristics for a cross-sectional sample of doctors of chiropractic (DCs), licensed acupuncturists (LAcs), and licensed massage therapists (LMTs) in the United States. METHODS: Using a cross-sectional telephone survey of DCs (n = 32), LAcs (n = 70), and LMTs (n = 184) in the Tucson, AZ metropolitan area, we collected data about each location where practitioners work, as well as measures on practitioner and practice characteristics including: patient volume, number of locations where practitioners worked, CAM practitioner types working at each location, and business models of practice. RESULTS: The majority of practitioners reported having one practice location (93.8% of DCs, 80% of LAcs and 59.8% of LMTs) where they treat patients. Patient volume/week was related to practitioner type; DCs saw 83.13 (SD = 49.29) patients/week, LAcs saw 22.29 (SD = 16.88) patients/week, and LMTs saw 14.21 (SD =10.25) patients per week. Practitioners completed surveys for N = 388 practice locations. Many CAM practices were found to be multidisciplinary and/or have more than one practitioner: 9/35 (25.7%) chiropractic practices, 24/87 (27.6%) acupuncture practices, and 141/266 (53.0%) massage practices. Practice business models across CAM practitioner types were heterogeneous, e.g. sole proprietor, employee, partner, and independent contractor. CONCLUSIONS: CAM practices vary across and within disciplines in ways that can significantly impact design and implementation of practice-based research. CAM research and intervention programs need to be mindful of the heterogeneity of CAM practices in order to create appropriate interventions, study designs, and implementation plans.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1472-6882/15/140en
dc.rights© 2015 Floden et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectComplementary and alternative medicineen
dc.subjectPractitionersen
dc.subjectChiropractorsen
dc.subjectAcupuncturistsen
dc.subjectMassage therapistsen
dc.subjectPractice-based researchen
dc.subjectPractice patternsen
dc.subjectCross-sectional surveyen
dc.titleConsiderations for practice-based research: a cross-sectional survey of chiropractic, acupuncture and massage practicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1472-6882en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicineen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Anthropology, University of Arizonaen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Complementary and Alternative Medicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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