Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan-positive recurrent papillary thyroid cancer and the prognosis and implications for surgical management

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610263
Title:
Fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan-positive recurrent papillary thyroid cancer and the prognosis and implications for surgical management
Author:
Schreinemakers, Jennifer; Vriens, Menno; Munoz-Perez, Nuria; Guerrero, Marlon; Suh, Insoo; Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Gosnell, Jessica; Shen, Wen; Clark, Orlo; Duh, Quan-Yang
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of California, 1600 Divisadero Street, Box 1711, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USA; Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht, CX, 3584, the Netherlands; Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Avenida de las Fuerzas Armadas 2, Granada, 18012, Spain; Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Avenue, Tuscon, AZ, 85724, USA
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Schreinemakers et al. World Journal of Surgical Oncology 2012, 10:192 http://www.wjso.com/content/10/1/192
Journal:
World Journal of Surgical Oncology
Rights:
© 2012 Schreinemakers et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:To compare outcomes for patients with recurrent or persistent papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) who had metastatic tumors that were fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) positive or negative, and to determine whether the FDG-PET scan findings changed the outcome of medical and surgical management.METHODS:From a prospective thyroid cancer database, we retrospectively identified patients with recurrent or persistent PTC and reviewed data on demographics, initial stage, location and extent of persistent or recurrent disease, clinical management, disease-free survival and outcome. We further identified subsets of patients who had an FDG-PET scan or an FDG-PET/CT scan and whole-body radioactive iodine scans and categorized them by whether they had one or more FDG-PET-avid (PET-positive) lesions or PET-negative lesions. The medical and surgical treatments and outcome of these patients were compared.RESULTS:Between 1984 and 2008, 41 of 141 patients who had recurrent or persistent PTC underwent FDG-PET (n = 11) or FDG-PET/CT scans (n = 30); 22 patients (54%) had one or more PET-positive lesion(s), 17 (41%) had PET-negative lesions, and two had indeterminate lesions. Most PET-positive lesions were located in the neck (55%). Patients who had a PET-positive lesion had a significantly higher TNM stage (P = 0.01), higher age (P = 0.03), and higher thyroglobulin (P = 0.024). Only patients who had PET-positive lesions died (5/22 vs. 0/17 for PET-negative lesions; P = 0.04). In two of the seven patients who underwent surgical resection of their PET-positive lesions, loco-regional control was obtained without evidence of residual disease.CONCLUSION:Patients with recurrent or persistent PTC and FDG-PET-positive lesions have a worse prognosis. In some patients loco-regional control can be obtained without evidence of residual disease by reoperation if the lesion is localized in the neck or mediastinum.
EISSN:
1477-7819
DOI:
10.1186/1477-7819-10-192
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.wjso.com/content/10/1/192

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchreinemakers, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorVriens, Mennoen
dc.contributor.authorMunoz-Perez, Nuriaen
dc.contributor.authorGuerrero, Marlonen
dc.contributor.authorSuh, Insooen
dc.contributor.authorRinkes, Inne H. M.en
dc.contributor.authorGosnell, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorShen, Wenen
dc.contributor.authorClark, Orloen
dc.contributor.authorDuh, Quan-Yangen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:02:32Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:02:32Z-
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationSchreinemakers et al. World Journal of Surgical Oncology 2012, 10:192 http://www.wjso.com/content/10/1/192en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1477-7819-10-192en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610263-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:To compare outcomes for patients with recurrent or persistent papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) who had metastatic tumors that were fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) positive or negative, and to determine whether the FDG-PET scan findings changed the outcome of medical and surgical management.METHODS:From a prospective thyroid cancer database, we retrospectively identified patients with recurrent or persistent PTC and reviewed data on demographics, initial stage, location and extent of persistent or recurrent disease, clinical management, disease-free survival and outcome. We further identified subsets of patients who had an FDG-PET scan or an FDG-PET/CT scan and whole-body radioactive iodine scans and categorized them by whether they had one or more FDG-PET-avid (PET-positive) lesions or PET-negative lesions. The medical and surgical treatments and outcome of these patients were compared.RESULTS:Between 1984 and 2008, 41 of 141 patients who had recurrent or persistent PTC underwent FDG-PET (n = 11) or FDG-PET/CT scans (n = 30)en
dc.description.abstract22 patients (54%) had one or more PET-positive lesion(s), 17 (41%) had PET-negative lesions, and two had indeterminate lesions. Most PET-positive lesions were located in the neck (55%). Patients who had a PET-positive lesion had a significantly higher TNM stage (P = 0.01), higher age (P = 0.03), and higher thyroglobulin (P = 0.024). Only patients who had PET-positive lesions died (5/22 vs. 0/17 for PET-negative lesionsen
dc.description.abstractP = 0.04). In two of the seven patients who underwent surgical resection of their PET-positive lesions, loco-regional control was obtained without evidence of residual disease.CONCLUSION:Patients with recurrent or persistent PTC and FDG-PET-positive lesions have a worse prognosis. In some patients loco-regional control can be obtained without evidence of residual disease by reoperation if the lesion is localized in the neck or mediastinum.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.wjso.com/content/10/1/192en
dc.rights© 2012 Schreinemakers et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleFluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scan-positive recurrent papillary thyroid cancer and the prognosis and implications for surgical managementen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1477-7819en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, University of California, 1600 Divisadero Street, Box 1711, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, Utrecht, CX, 3584, the Netherlandsen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Avenida de las Fuerzas Armadas 2, Granada, 18012, Spainen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, University of Arizona, 1501 North Campbell Avenue, Tuscon, AZ, 85724, USAen
dc.identifier.journalWorld Journal of Surgical Oncologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.