Women's preferences for selective estrogen reuptake modulators: an investigation using the time trade-off technique

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610252
Title:
Women's preferences for selective estrogen reuptake modulators: an investigation using the time trade-off technique
Author:
Ralph, Angelique; Ager, Brittany; Bell, Melanie; Collins, Ian; Andrews, Lesley; Tucker, Kathy; O'Reilly, Nicole; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Butow, Phyllis
Affiliation:
School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia; Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), University of Sydney, Sydney, New SouthWales 2006, Australia; Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USA; Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002, Australia; Sir Peter MacCallum Dept. of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia; Hereditary Cancer Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospital, 147 Barker Street, Randwick, New South Wales 2031, Australia; School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Randwick, New South Wales 2031, Australia; Centre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
SpringerOpen
Citation:
Ralph et al. SpringerPlus 2014, 3:264 http://www.springerplus.com/content/3/1/264
Journal:
SpringerPlus
Rights:
© 2014 Ralph et al.; licensee Springer. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
PURPOSE:Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) reduce the risk of breast cancer for women at increased risk by 38%. However, uptake is extremely low and the reasons for this are not completely understood. The aims of this study were to utilize time trade-off methods to determine the degree of risk reduction required to make taking SERMs worthwhile to women, and the factors associated with requiring greater risk reduction to take SERMs.METHODS:Women at increased risk of breast cancer (N=107) were recruited from two familial cancer clinics in Australia. Participants completed a questionnaire either online or in pen and paper format. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was used to analyze the data.RESULTS:Overall, there was considerable heterogeneity in the degree of risk reduction required to make taking SERMs worthwhile. Women with higher perceived breast cancer risk and those with stronger intentions to undergo (or who had undergone) an oophorectomy required a smaller degree of risk reduction to consider taking SERMs worthwhile.CONCLUSION:Women at increased familial risk appear motivated to consider SERMs for prevention. A tailored approach to communicating about medical prevention is essential. Health professionals could usefully highlight the absolute (rather than relative) probability of side effects and take into account an individual's perceived (rather than objective) risk of breast cancer.
EISSN:
2193-1801
DOI:
10.1186/2193-1801-3-264
Keywords:
Breast cancer; Chemoprevention; SERMs; Patient preferences; BRCA1
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.springerplus.com/content/3/1/264

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRalph, Angeliqueen
dc.contributor.authorAger, Brittanyen
dc.contributor.authorBell, Melanieen
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Ianen
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Lesleyen
dc.contributor.authorTucker, Kathyen
dc.contributor.authorO'Reilly, Nicoleen
dc.contributor.authorPhillips, Kelly-Anneen
dc.contributor.authorButow, Phyllisen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:02:15Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:02:15Z-
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationRalph et al. SpringerPlus 2014, 3:264 http://www.springerplus.com/content/3/1/264en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/2193-1801-3-264en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610252-
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE:Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulators (SERMs) reduce the risk of breast cancer for women at increased risk by 38%. However, uptake is extremely low and the reasons for this are not completely understood. The aims of this study were to utilize time trade-off methods to determine the degree of risk reduction required to make taking SERMs worthwhile to women, and the factors associated with requiring greater risk reduction to take SERMs.METHODS:Women at increased risk of breast cancer (N=107) were recruited from two familial cancer clinics in Australia. Participants completed a questionnaire either online or in pen and paper format. Hierarchical multiple linear regression analysis was used to analyze the data.RESULTS:Overall, there was considerable heterogeneity in the degree of risk reduction required to make taking SERMs worthwhile. Women with higher perceived breast cancer risk and those with stronger intentions to undergo (or who had undergone) an oophorectomy required a smaller degree of risk reduction to consider taking SERMs worthwhile.CONCLUSION:Women at increased familial risk appear motivated to consider SERMs for prevention. A tailored approach to communicating about medical prevention is essential. Health professionals could usefully highlight the absolute (rather than relative) probability of side effects and take into account an individual's perceived (rather than objective) risk of breast cancer.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringerOpenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.springerplus.com/content/3/1/264en
dc.rights© 2014 Ralph et al.; licensee Springer. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectBreast canceren
dc.subjectChemopreventionen
dc.subjectSERMsen
dc.subjectPatient preferencesen
dc.subjectBRCA1en
dc.titleWomen's preferences for selective estrogen reuptake modulators: an investigation using the time trade-off techniqueen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2193-1801en
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Psychology, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentPsycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG), University of Sydney, Sydney, New SouthWales 2006, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentMel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria 3002, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentSir Peter MacCallum Dept. of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentHereditary Cancer Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospital, 147 Barker Street, Randwick, New South Wales 2031, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Randwick, New South Wales 2031, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Medical Psychology and Evidence-based Decision-making (CeMPED), University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australiaen
dc.identifier.journalSpringerPlusen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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