Reversal of childhood idiopathic scoliosis in an adult, without surgery: a case report and literature review

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610250
Title:
Reversal of childhood idiopathic scoliosis in an adult, without surgery: a case report and literature review
Author:
Brooks, William; Krupinski, Elizabeth; Hawes, Martha
Affiliation:
Restorative Care Foundation, Kansas City, MO 64152, USA; Department of Radiology, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85724, USA; Division of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USA
Issue Date:
2009
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Scoliosis 2009, 4:27 doi:10.1186/1748-7161-4-27
Journal:
Scoliosis
Rights:
© 2009 Brooks et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Some patients with mild or moderate thoracic scoliosis (Cobb angle <50-60 degrees) suffer disproportionate impairment of pulmonary function associated with deformities in the sagittal plane and reduced flexibility of the spine and chest cage. Long-term improvement in the clinical signs and symptoms of childhood onset scoliosis in an adult, without surgical intervention, has not been documented previously. CASE PRESENTATION:A diagnosis of thoracic scoliosis (Cobb angle 45 degrees) with pectus excavatum and thoracic hypokyphosis in a female patient (DOB 9/17/52) was made in June 1964. Immediate spinal fusion was strongly recommended, but the patient elected a daily home exercise program taught during a 6-week period of training by a physical therapist. This regime was carried out through 1992, with daily aerobic exercise added in 1974. The Cobb angle of the primary thoracic curvature remained unchanged. Ongoing clinical symptoms included dyspnea at rest and recurrent respiratory infections. A period of multimodal treatment with clinical monitoring and treatment by an osteopathic physician was initiated when the patient was 40 years old. This included deep tissue massage (1992-1996); outpatient psychological therapy (1992-1993); a daily home exercise program focused on mobilization of the chest wall (1992-2005); and manipulative medicine (1994-1995, 1999-2000). Progressive improvement in chest wall excursion, increased thoracic kyphosis, and resolution of long-standing respiratory symptoms occurred concomitant with a >10 degree decrease in Cobb angle magnitude of the primary thoracic curvature. CONCLUSION:This report documents improved chest wall function and resolution of respiratory symptoms in response to nonsurgical approaches in an adult female, diagnosed at age eleven years with idiopathic scoliosis.
EISSN:
1748-7161
DOI:
10.1186/1748-7161-4-27
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.scoliosisjournal.com/content/4/1/27

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrooks, Williamen
dc.contributor.authorKrupinski, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorHawes, Marthaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:02:12Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:02:12Z-
dc.date.issued2009en
dc.identifier.citationScoliosis 2009, 4:27 doi:10.1186/1748-7161-4-27en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1748-7161-4-27en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610250-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Some patients with mild or moderate thoracic scoliosis (Cobb angle <50-60 degrees) suffer disproportionate impairment of pulmonary function associated with deformities in the sagittal plane and reduced flexibility of the spine and chest cage. Long-term improvement in the clinical signs and symptoms of childhood onset scoliosis in an adult, without surgical intervention, has not been documented previously. CASE PRESENTATION:A diagnosis of thoracic scoliosis (Cobb angle 45 degrees) with pectus excavatum and thoracic hypokyphosis in a female patient (DOB 9/17/52) was made in June 1964. Immediate spinal fusion was strongly recommended, but the patient elected a daily home exercise program taught during a 6-week period of training by a physical therapist. This regime was carried out through 1992, with daily aerobic exercise added in 1974. The Cobb angle of the primary thoracic curvature remained unchanged. Ongoing clinical symptoms included dyspnea at rest and recurrent respiratory infections. A period of multimodal treatment with clinical monitoring and treatment by an osteopathic physician was initiated when the patient was 40 years old. This included deep tissue massage (1992-1996); outpatient psychological therapy (1992-1993); a daily home exercise program focused on mobilization of the chest wall (1992-2005); and manipulative medicine (1994-1995, 1999-2000). Progressive improvement in chest wall excursion, increased thoracic kyphosis, and resolution of long-standing respiratory symptoms occurred concomitant with a >10 degree decrease in Cobb angle magnitude of the primary thoracic curvature. CONCLUSION:This report documents improved chest wall function and resolution of respiratory symptoms in response to nonsurgical approaches in an adult female, diagnosed at age eleven years with idiopathic scoliosis.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.scoliosisjournal.com/content/4/1/27en
dc.rights© 2009 Brooks et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleReversal of childhood idiopathic scoliosis in an adult, without surgery: a case report and literature reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1748-7161en
dc.contributor.departmentRestorative Care Foundation, Kansas City, MO 64152, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85724, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USAen
dc.identifier.journalScoliosisen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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