Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610240
Title:
The coming-of-age of the hygiene hypothesis
Author:
Martinez, Fernando
Affiliation:
The Respiratory Sciences Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Respir Res 2001, 2:129–132 http://respiratory-research.com/content/2/3/129
Journal:
Respiratory Research
Rights:
© 2001 BioMed Central Ltd
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
The hygiene hypothesis, as originally proposed, postulated an inverse relation between the incidence of infectious diseases in early life and the subsequent development of allergies and asthma. New evidence from epidemiological, biological and genetic studies has significantly enlarged the scope of the hypothesis. It now appears probable that environmental 'danger' signals regulate the pattern of immune responses in early life. Microbial burden in general, and not any single acute infectious illness, is the main source of these signals. The latter interact with a sensitive and complex receptor system, and genetic variations in this receptor system may be an important determinant of inherited susceptibility to asthma and allergies.
EISSN:
1465-993X
DOI:
10.1186/rr48
Keywords:
atopy; CD14; endotoxin; genetics; hygiene
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://respiratory-research.com/content/2/3/129

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMartinez, Fernandoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:01:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:01:57Z-
dc.date.issued2001en
dc.identifier.citationRespir Res 2001, 2:129–132 http://respiratory-research.com/content/2/3/129en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/rr48en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610240-
dc.description.abstractThe hygiene hypothesis, as originally proposed, postulated an inverse relation between the incidence of infectious diseases in early life and the subsequent development of allergies and asthma. New evidence from epidemiological, biological and genetic studies has significantly enlarged the scope of the hypothesis. It now appears probable that environmental 'danger' signals regulate the pattern of immune responses in early life. Microbial burden in general, and not any single acute infectious illness, is the main source of these signals. The latter interact with a sensitive and complex receptor system, and genetic variations in this receptor system may be an important determinant of inherited susceptibility to asthma and allergies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://respiratory-research.com/content/2/3/129en
dc.rights© 2001 BioMed Central Ltden
dc.subjectatopyen
dc.subjectCD14en
dc.subjectendotoxinen
dc.subjectgeneticsen
dc.subjecthygieneen
dc.titleThe coming-of-age of the hygiene hypothesisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1465-993Xen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Respiratory Sciences Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USAen
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory Researchen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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