Examining the relationship between diet-induced acidosis and cancer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610226
Title:
Examining the relationship between diet-induced acidosis and cancer
Author:
Robey, Ian Forrest
Affiliation:
Arizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Suite 2349, PO Box 245030, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USA
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Robey Nutrition & Metabolism 2012, 9:72 http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/9/1/72
Journal:
Nutrition & Metabolism
Rights:
© 2012 Robey; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Increased cancer risk is associated with select dietary factors. Dietary lifestyles can alter systemic acid-base balance over time. Acidogenic diets, which are typically high in animal protein and salt and low in fruits and vegetables, can lead to a sub-clinical or low-grade state of metabolic acidosis. The relationship between diet and cancer risk prompts questions about the role of acidosis in the initiation and progression of cancer. Cancer is triggered by genetic and epigenetic perturbations in the normal cell, but it has become clear that microenvironmental and systemic factors exert modifying effects on cancer cell development. While there are no studies showing a direct link between diet-induced acidosis and cancer, acid-base disequilibrium has been shown to modulate molecular activity including adrenal glucocorticoid, insulin growth factor (IGF-1), and adipocyte cytokine signaling, dysregulated cellular metabolism, and osteoclast activation, which may serve as intermediary or downstream effectors of carcinogenesis or tumor promotion. In short, diet-induced acidosis may influence molecular activities at the cellular level that promote carcinogenesis or tumor progression. This review defines the relationship between dietary lifestyle and acid-base balance and discusses the potential consequences of diet-induced acidosis and cancer occurrence or progression.
EISSN:
1743-7075
DOI:
10.1186/1743-7075-9-72
Keywords:
Acid-base balance; Diet; Acidosis; Cancer
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/9/1/72

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRobey, Ian Forresten
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:01:33Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:01:33Z-
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationRobey Nutrition & Metabolism 2012, 9:72 http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/9/1/72en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1743-7075-9-72en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610226-
dc.description.abstractIncreased cancer risk is associated with select dietary factors. Dietary lifestyles can alter systemic acid-base balance over time. Acidogenic diets, which are typically high in animal protein and salt and low in fruits and vegetables, can lead to a sub-clinical or low-grade state of metabolic acidosis. The relationship between diet and cancer risk prompts questions about the role of acidosis in the initiation and progression of cancer. Cancer is triggered by genetic and epigenetic perturbations in the normal cell, but it has become clear that microenvironmental and systemic factors exert modifying effects on cancer cell development. While there are no studies showing a direct link between diet-induced acidosis and cancer, acid-base disequilibrium has been shown to modulate molecular activity including adrenal glucocorticoid, insulin growth factor (IGF-1), and adipocyte cytokine signaling, dysregulated cellular metabolism, and osteoclast activation, which may serve as intermediary or downstream effectors of carcinogenesis or tumor promotion. In short, diet-induced acidosis may influence molecular activities at the cellular level that promote carcinogenesis or tumor progression. This review defines the relationship between dietary lifestyle and acid-base balance and discusses the potential consequences of diet-induced acidosis and cancer occurrence or progression.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/content/9/1/72en
dc.rights© 2012 Robey; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectAcid-base balanceen
dc.subjectDieten
dc.subjectAcidosisen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.titleExamining the relationship between diet-induced acidosis and canceren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1743-7075en
dc.contributor.departmentArizona Respiratory Center, University of Arizona, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Suite 2349, PO Box 245030, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USAen
dc.identifier.journalNutrition & Metabolismen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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