Dichotomy effects of Akt signaling in breast cancer

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610205
Title:
Dichotomy effects of Akt signaling in breast cancer
Author:
Peng, Zhengang; Weber, Jennifer; Han, Zhaosheng; Shen, Rulong; Zhou, Wenchao; Scott, James; Chan, Michael; Lin, Huey-Jen
Affiliation:
Division of Medical Technology, School of Allied Medical Professions, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210, USA; Molecular Biology and Cancer Genetics Program, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; Department of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA; College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA; Department of Life Science and Human Epigenomics Center, National Chung Cheng University, Min-Hsiung, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, ROC; Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Delaware, Room 305 Willard Hall Education Building, 16 West Main Street, Newark, Delaware, 19716, USA
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Peng et al. Molecular Cancer 2012, 11:61 http://www.molecular-cancer.com/content/11/1/61
Journal:
Molecular Cancer
Rights:
© 2012 Peng et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:The oncogenic roles contributed by the Akt/PKB kinase family remain controversial and presumably depend on cell context, but are perceived to be modulated by an interplay and net balance between various isoforms. This study is intended to decipher whether distinct Akt kinase isoforms exert either redundant or unique functions in regulating neoplastic features of breast cancer cells, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cell motility, and stem/progenitor cell expansion.RESULTS:We demonstrate that overactivation of Akt signaling in nonmalignant MCF10A cells and in primary cultures of normal human mammary epithelial tissue results in previously unreported inhibitory effects on EMT, cell motility and stem/progenitor cell expansion. Importantly, this effect is largely redundant and independent of Akt isoform types. However, using a series of isogenic cell lines derived from MCF-10A cells but exhibiting varying stages of progressive tumorigenesis, we observe that this inhibition of neoplastic behavior can be reversed in epithelial cells that have advanced to a highly malignant state. In contrast to the tumor suppressive properties of Akt, activated Akt signaling in MCF10A cells can rescue cell viability upon treatment with cytotoxic agents. This feature is regarded as tumor-promoting.CONCLUSION:We demonstrate that Akt signaling conveys novel dichotomy effects in which its oncogenic properties contributes mainly to sustaining cell viability, as opposed to the its tumor suppressing effects, which are mediated by repressing EMT, cell motility, and stem/progenitor cell expansion. While the former exerts a tumor-enhancing effect, the latter merely acts as a safeguard by restraining epithelial cells at the primary sites until metastatic spread can be moved forward, a process that is presumably dictated by the permissive tumor microenvironment or additional oncogenic insults.
EISSN:
1476-4598
DOI:
10.1186/1476-4598-11-61
Keywords:
Activated Akt signaling; Breast epithelia; Epithelial-mesenchymal transition; Motility; Stem-progenitor cells
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.molecular-cancer.com/content/11/1/61

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPeng, Zhengangen
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorHan, Zhaoshengen
dc.contributor.authorShen, Rulongen
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Wenchaoen
dc.contributor.authorScott, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorChan, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorLin, Huey-Jenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:01:03Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:01:03Z-
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationPeng et al. Molecular Cancer 2012, 11:61 http://www.molecular-cancer.com/content/11/1/61en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1476-4598-11-61en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610205-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:The oncogenic roles contributed by the Akt/PKB kinase family remain controversial and presumably depend on cell context, but are perceived to be modulated by an interplay and net balance between various isoforms. This study is intended to decipher whether distinct Akt kinase isoforms exert either redundant or unique functions in regulating neoplastic features of breast cancer cells, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cell motility, and stem/progenitor cell expansion.RESULTS:We demonstrate that overactivation of Akt signaling in nonmalignant MCF10A cells and in primary cultures of normal human mammary epithelial tissue results in previously unreported inhibitory effects on EMT, cell motility and stem/progenitor cell expansion. Importantly, this effect is largely redundant and independent of Akt isoform types. However, using a series of isogenic cell lines derived from MCF-10A cells but exhibiting varying stages of progressive tumorigenesis, we observe that this inhibition of neoplastic behavior can be reversed in epithelial cells that have advanced to a highly malignant state. In contrast to the tumor suppressive properties of Akt, activated Akt signaling in MCF10A cells can rescue cell viability upon treatment with cytotoxic agents. This feature is regarded as tumor-promoting.CONCLUSION:We demonstrate that Akt signaling conveys novel dichotomy effects in which its oncogenic properties contributes mainly to sustaining cell viability, as opposed to the its tumor suppressing effects, which are mediated by repressing EMT, cell motility, and stem/progenitor cell expansion. While the former exerts a tumor-enhancing effect, the latter merely acts as a safeguard by restraining epithelial cells at the primary sites until metastatic spread can be moved forward, a process that is presumably dictated by the permissive tumor microenvironment or additional oncogenic insults.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.molecular-cancer.com/content/11/1/61en
dc.rights© 2012 Peng et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectActivated Akt signalingen
dc.subjectBreast epitheliaen
dc.subjectEpithelial-mesenchymal transitionen
dc.subjectMotilityen
dc.subjectStem-progenitor cellsen
dc.titleDichotomy effects of Akt signaling in breast canceren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1476-4598en
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Medical Technology, School of Allied Medical Professions, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentMolecular Biology and Cancer Genetics Program, Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pathology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Medicine, University of Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Life Science and Human Epigenomics Center, National Chung Cheng University, Min-Hsiung, Chia-Yi, Taiwan, ROCen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Laboratory Sciences, University of Delaware, Room 305 Willard Hall Education Building, 16 West Main Street, Newark, Delaware, 19716, USAen
dc.identifier.journalMolecular Canceren
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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