Bacterial communities on classroom surfaces vary with human contact

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610203
Title:
Bacterial communities on classroom surfaces vary with human contact
Author:
Meadow, James; Altrichter, Adam; Kembel, Steven; Moriyama, Maxwell; O'Connor, Timothy; Womack, Ann; Brown, G.; Green, Jessica; Bohannan, Brendan J.
Affiliation:
Biology and the Built Environment Center, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Oregon, 5389 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA; Department of Biological Sciences, University of Quebec, 320 Rue Sainte-Catherine Est, Montréal, QC H2X 1 L7, Canada; Energy Studies in Buildings Laboratory, Department of Architecture, University of Oregon, 1206 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, BioSciences West room 310, 1041 E. Lowell St, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA; Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Rd, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USA
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Meadow et al. Microbiome 2014, 2:7 http://www.microbiomejournal.com/content/2/1/7
Journal:
Microbiome
Rights:
© 2014 Meadow et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Humans can spend the majority of their time indoors, but little is known about the interactions between the human and built-environment microbiomes or the forces that drive microbial community assembly in the built environment. We sampled 16S rRNA genes from four different surface types throughout a university classroom to determine whether bacterial assemblages on each surface were best predicted by routine human interactions or by proximity to other surfaces within the classroom. We then analyzed our data with publicly-available datasets representing potential source environments.RESULTS:Bacterial assemblages from the four surface types, as well as individual taxa, were indicative of different source pools related to the type of human contact each surface routinely encounters. Spatial proximity to other surfaces in the classroom did not predict community composition.CONCLUSIONS:Our results indicate that human-associated microbial communities can be transferred to indoor surfaces following contact, and that such transmission is possible even when contact is indirect, but that proximity to other surfaces in the classroom does not influence community composition.
EISSN:
2049-2618
DOI:
10.1186/2049-2618-2-7
Keywords:
Built environment; Microbial ecology; Indoor microbiology; Lactobacillus
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.microbiomejournal.com/content/2/1/7

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMeadow, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorAltrichter, Adamen
dc.contributor.authorKembel, Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorMoriyama, Maxwellen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Timothyen
dc.contributor.authorWomack, Annen
dc.contributor.authorBrown, G.en
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorBohannan, Brendan J.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:00:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:00:59Z-
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationMeadow et al. Microbiome 2014, 2:7 http://www.microbiomejournal.com/content/2/1/7en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/2049-2618-2-7en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610203-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Humans can spend the majority of their time indoors, but little is known about the interactions between the human and built-environment microbiomes or the forces that drive microbial community assembly in the built environment. We sampled 16S rRNA genes from four different surface types throughout a university classroom to determine whether bacterial assemblages on each surface were best predicted by routine human interactions or by proximity to other surfaces within the classroom. We then analyzed our data with publicly-available datasets representing potential source environments.RESULTS:Bacterial assemblages from the four surface types, as well as individual taxa, were indicative of different source pools related to the type of human contact each surface routinely encounters. Spatial proximity to other surfaces in the classroom did not predict community composition.CONCLUSIONS:Our results indicate that human-associated microbial communities can be transferred to indoor surfaces following contact, and that such transmission is possible even when contact is indirect, but that proximity to other surfaces in the classroom does not influence community composition.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.microbiomejournal.com/content/2/1/7en
dc.rights© 2014 Meadow et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectBuilt environmenten
dc.subjectMicrobial ecologyen
dc.subjectIndoor microbiologyen
dc.subjectLactobacillusen
dc.titleBacterial communities on classroom surfaces vary with human contacten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2049-2618en
dc.contributor.departmentBiology and the Built Environment Center, Institute of Ecology and Evolution, University of Oregon, 5389 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciences, University of Quebec, 320 Rue Sainte-Catherine Est, Montréal, QC H2X 1 L7, Canadaen
dc.contributor.departmentEnergy Studies in Buildings Laboratory, Department of Architecture, University of Oregon, 1206 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, BioSciences West room 310, 1041 E. Lowell St, Tucson, AZ 85721, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentSanta Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Rd, Santa Fe, NM 87501, USAen
dc.identifier.journalMicrobiomeen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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