Challenges facing translational research organizations in China: a qualitative multiple case study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610199
Title:
Challenges facing translational research organizations in China: a qualitative multiple case study
Author:
Zhou, Laixin; Li, Ying; Bosworth, Hayden; Ehiri, John; Luo, Changkun
Affiliation:
College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China; Department of Social Medicine & Health Service Management, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China; Department of Medicine / General Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; Division of Health Promotion Sciences/Global Health Institute, Mel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA; Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Road, Chongqing, Shapingba district 400038, China
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Zhou et al. Journal of Translational Medicine 2013, 11:256 http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/11/1/256
Journal:
Journal of Translational Medicine
Rights:
© 2013 Zhou et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Translational medicine is attracting much attention worldwide and many translational research organizations (TROs) have been established. In China, translational medicine has developed rapidly, but faces many challenges. This study was aimed at exploring these challenges faced by emerging TROs in China.METHOD:A qualitative, multiple case study approach was used to assess the challenges faced by TROs in China. Data were collected between May and August 2012.RESULTS:Eight cases were identified. Overall, four themes that characterized TROs in China emerged from analyses: 1. objectives, organizer, and funding resources, 2. participating partners and research teams, 3. management, and 4. achievements. All TROs had objectives related to translating basic discovery to clinic treatment and cultivating translational researchers. In terms of organizer and funding resources, 7 out of 8 TROs were launched only by universities and/or hospitals, and funded mostly through research grants. As for participating partners and multidisciplinary research teams, all but one of the TROs only involved biomedical research institutions who were interested in translational research, and characterized as clinical research centers; 7 out of 8 TROs involved only researchers from biomedicine and clinical disciplines and none involved disciplines related to education, ethnicity, and sociology, or engaged the community. Current management of the TROs were generally nested within the traditional research management paradigms, and failed to adapt to the tenets of translational research. Half of the TROs were at developmental stages defined as infrastructure construction and recruitment of translational researchers.CONCLUSIONS:TROs in China face the challenge of attracting sustainable funding sources, widening multidisciplinary cooperation, cultivating multi-disciplinary translational researchers and adapting current research management to translational research. Greater emphasis should be placed on increasing multidisciplinary cooperation, and innovating in education programs to cultivate of translational researchers. Efforts should be made to reform research management in TROs, and establish sustainable funding resources.
EISSN:
1479-5876
DOI:
10.1186/1479-5876-11-256
Keywords:
Translational medicine; Translational research organization; Translational medical center; Case study
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/11/1/256

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Laixinen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yingen
dc.contributor.authorBosworth, Haydenen
dc.contributor.authorEhiri, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Changkunen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:00:53Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:00:53Z-
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationZhou et al. Journal of Translational Medicine 2013, 11:256 http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/11/1/256en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1479-5876-11-256en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610199-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Translational medicine is attracting much attention worldwide and many translational research organizations (TROs) have been established. In China, translational medicine has developed rapidly, but faces many challenges. This study was aimed at exploring these challenges faced by emerging TROs in China.METHOD:A qualitative, multiple case study approach was used to assess the challenges faced by TROs in China. Data were collected between May and August 2012.RESULTS:Eight cases were identified. Overall, four themes that characterized TROs in China emerged from analyses: 1. objectives, organizer, and funding resources, 2. participating partners and research teams, 3. management, and 4. achievements. All TROs had objectives related to translating basic discovery to clinic treatment and cultivating translational researchers. In terms of organizer and funding resources, 7 out of 8 TROs were launched only by universities and/or hospitals, and funded mostly through research grants. As for participating partners and multidisciplinary research teams, all but one of the TROs only involved biomedical research institutions who were interested in translational research, and characterized as clinical research centersen
dc.description.abstract7 out of 8 TROs involved only researchers from biomedicine and clinical disciplines and none involved disciplines related to education, ethnicity, and sociology, or engaged the community. Current management of the TROs were generally nested within the traditional research management paradigms, and failed to adapt to the tenets of translational research. Half of the TROs were at developmental stages defined as infrastructure construction and recruitment of translational researchers.CONCLUSIONS:TROs in China face the challenge of attracting sustainable funding sources, widening multidisciplinary cooperation, cultivating multi-disciplinary translational researchers and adapting current research management to translational research. Greater emphasis should be placed on increasing multidisciplinary cooperation, and innovating in education programs to cultivate of translational researchers. Efforts should be made to reform research management in TROs, and establish sustainable funding resources.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.translational-medicine.com/content/11/1/256en
dc.rights© 2013 Zhou et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectTranslational medicineen
dc.subjectTranslational research organizationen
dc.subjectTranslational medical centeren
dc.subjectCase studyen
dc.titleChallenges facing translational research organizations in China: a qualitative multiple case studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1479-5876en
dc.contributor.departmentCollege of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, Chinaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Social Medicine & Health Service Management, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, Chinaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine / General Internal Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Health Promotion Sciences/Global Health Institute, Mel & Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentThird Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Road, Chongqing, Shapingba district 400038, Chinaen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Translational Medicineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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