Core strength: A new model for injury prediction and prevention

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610195
Title:
Core strength: A new model for injury prediction and prevention
Author:
Peate, W. F.; Bates, Gerry; Lunda, Karen; Francis, Smitha; Bellamy, Kristen
Affiliation:
University of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman Arizona College of Public Health, Drachman Hall, 1295 N. Martin Avenue, Tucson, Arizona, USA; Tucson Fire Department, Health and Safety, 421 South Church, Tucson, Arizona, USA; Lunda and Associates, 1636 North Swan, Tucson, Arizona, USA
Issue Date:
2007
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology 2007, 2:3 doi:10.1186/1745-6673-2-3
Journal:
Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology
Rights:
© 2007 Peate et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
OBJECTIVE:Many work in injury prone awkward positions that require adequate flexibility and strength in trunk stabilizer muscle groups. Performance on a functional movement screen (FMS) that assessed those factors was conducted and an intervention was designed.METHODS:A battery of FMS tests were performed on 433 firefighters. We analyzed the correlation between FMS performance and injuries and other selected parameters. An intervention to improve flexibility and strength in trunk stabilizer or core muscle groups through a training program was evaluated.RESULTS:The intervention reduced lost time due to injuries by 62% and the number of injuries by 42% over a twelve month period as compared to a historical control group.CONCLUSION:These findings suggest that core strength and functional movement enhancement programs to prevent injuries in workers whose work involves awkward positions is warranted.
EISSN:
1745-6673
DOI:
10.1186/1745-6673-2-3
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.occup-med.com/content/2/1/3

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPeate, W. F.en
dc.contributor.authorBates, Gerryen
dc.contributor.authorLunda, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorFrancis, Smithaen
dc.contributor.authorBellamy, Kristenen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:00:46Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:00:46Z-
dc.date.issued2007en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology 2007, 2:3 doi:10.1186/1745-6673-2-3en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1745-6673-2-3en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610195-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE:Many work in injury prone awkward positions that require adequate flexibility and strength in trunk stabilizer muscle groups. Performance on a functional movement screen (FMS) that assessed those factors was conducted and an intervention was designed.METHODS:A battery of FMS tests were performed on 433 firefighters. We analyzed the correlation between FMS performance and injuries and other selected parameters. An intervention to improve flexibility and strength in trunk stabilizer or core muscle groups through a training program was evaluated.RESULTS:The intervention reduced lost time due to injuries by 62% and the number of injuries by 42% over a twelve month period as compared to a historical control group.CONCLUSION:These findings suggest that core strength and functional movement enhancement programs to prevent injuries in workers whose work involves awkward positions is warranted.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.occup-med.com/content/2/1/3en
dc.rights© 2007 Peate et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleCore strength: A new model for injury prediction and preventionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1745-6673en
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, Mel and Enid Zuckerman Arizona College of Public Health, Drachman Hall, 1295 N. Martin Avenue, Tucson, Arizona, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentTucson Fire Department, Health and Safety, 421 South Church, Tucson, Arizona, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentLunda and Associates, 1636 North Swan, Tucson, Arizona, USAen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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