A country bug in the city: urban infestation by the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans in Arequipa, Peru

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610166
Title:
A country bug in the city: urban infestation by the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans in Arequipa, Peru
Author:
Delgado, Stephen; Ernst, Kacey; Pumahuanca, Maria Luz; Yool, Stephen; Comrie, Andrew; Sterling, Charles; Gilman, Robert; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael; the Chagas Disease Working Group, in Arequipa
Affiliation:
School of Geography and Development, The University of Arizona, 409 Harvill Building, 1103 East Second Street, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Arizona, Roy P Drachman Hall, 1295 North Martin Avenue, PO Box 245211, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USA; Facultad de Ciencias y Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Avenida Honorio Delgado 430, Urbanización Ingeniería, Lima, Peru; School of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, The University of Arizona, 1117 East Lowell Street, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA; Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, 714 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Delgado et al. International Journal of Health Geographics 2013, 12:48 http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/12/1/48
Journal:
International Journal of Health Geographics
Rights:
© 2013 Delgado et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Interruption of vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi remains an unrealized objective in many Latin American countries. The task of vector control is complicated by the emergence of vector insects in urban areas.METHODS:Utilizing data from a large-scale vector control program in Arequipa, Peru, we explored the spatial patterns of infestation by Triatoma infestans in an urban and peri-urban landscape. Multilevel logistic regression was utilized to assess the associations between household infestation and household- and locality-level socio-environmental measures.RESULTS:Of 37,229 households inspected for infestation, 6,982 (18.8%; 95% CI: 18.4 - 19.2%) were infested by T. infestans. Eighty clusters of infestation were identified, ranging in area from 0.1 to 68.7 hectares and containing as few as one and as many as 1,139 infested households. Spatial dependence between infested households was significant at distances up to 2,000 meters. Household T. infestans infestation was associated with household- and locality-level factors, including housing density, elevation, land surface temperature, and locality type.CONCLUSIONS:High levels of T. infestans infestation, characterized by spatial heterogeneity, were found across extensive urban and peri-urban areas prior to vector control. Several environmental and social factors, which may directly or indirectly influence the biology and behavior of T. infestans, were associated with infestation. Spatial clustering of infestation in the urban context may both challenge and inform surveillance and control of vector reemergence after insecticide intervention.
EISSN:
1476-072X
DOI:
10.1186/1476-072X-12-48
Keywords:
Triatoma infestans; Chagas disease; Urban infestation; Vector control; Spatial analysis; Multilevel logistic regression
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/12/1/48

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDelgado, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorErnst, Kaceyen
dc.contributor.authorPumahuanca, Maria Luzen
dc.contributor.authorYool, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorComrie, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorSterling, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorGilman, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorNaquira, Cesaren
dc.contributor.authorLevy, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorthe Chagas Disease Working Group, in Arequipaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:00:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:00:08Z-
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationDelgado et al. International Journal of Health Geographics 2013, 12:48 http://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/12/1/48en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1476-072X-12-48en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610166-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Interruption of vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi remains an unrealized objective in many Latin American countries. The task of vector control is complicated by the emergence of vector insects in urban areas.METHODS:Utilizing data from a large-scale vector control program in Arequipa, Peru, we explored the spatial patterns of infestation by Triatoma infestans in an urban and peri-urban landscape. Multilevel logistic regression was utilized to assess the associations between household infestation and household- and locality-level socio-environmental measures.RESULTS:Of 37,229 households inspected for infestation, 6,982 (18.8%en
dc.description.abstract95% CI: 18.4 - 19.2%) were infested by T. infestans. Eighty clusters of infestation were identified, ranging in area from 0.1 to 68.7 hectares and containing as few as one and as many as 1,139 infested households. Spatial dependence between infested households was significant at distances up to 2,000 meters. Household T. infestans infestation was associated with household- and locality-level factors, including housing density, elevation, land surface temperature, and locality type.CONCLUSIONS:High levels of T. infestans infestation, characterized by spatial heterogeneity, were found across extensive urban and peri-urban areas prior to vector control. Several environmental and social factors, which may directly or indirectly influence the biology and behavior of T. infestans, were associated with infestation. Spatial clustering of infestation in the urban context may both challenge and inform surveillance and control of vector reemergence after insecticide intervention.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ij-healthgeographics.com/content/12/1/48en
dc.rights© 2013 Delgado et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectTriatoma infestansen
dc.subjectChagas diseaseen
dc.subjectUrban infestationen
dc.subjectVector controlen
dc.subjectSpatial analysisen
dc.subjectMultilevel logistic regressionen
dc.titleA country bug in the city: urban infestation by the Chagas disease vector Triatoma infestans in Arequipa, Peruen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1476-072Xen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Geography and Development, The University of Arizona, 409 Harvill Building, 1103 East Second Street, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The University of Arizona, Roy P Drachman Hall, 1295 North Martin Avenue, PO Box 245211, Tucson, Arizona 85724, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentFacultad de Ciencias y Filosofia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Avenida Honorio Delgado 430, Urbanización Ingeniería, Lima, Peruen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Animal and Comparative Biomedical Sciences, The University of Arizona, 1117 East Lowell Street, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentBloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, 714 Blockley Hall, 423 Guardian Drive, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USAen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Health Geographicsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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