The relationship between unsupervised time after school and physical activity in adolescent girls

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610163
Title:
The relationship between unsupervised time after school and physical activity in adolescent girls
Author:
Rushovich, Berenice; Voorhees, Carolyn; Davis, C. E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; Pfeiffer, Karin; Elder, John; Going, Scott; Marino, Vivian
Affiliation:
Department of Public and Community Health, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA; Department of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; Department of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USA; Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; Department of Biostatistics, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USA
Issue Date:
2006
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2006, 3:20 doi:10.1186/1479-5868-3-20
Journal:
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Rights:
© 2006 Rushovich et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Rising obesity and declining physical activity levels are of great concern because of the associated health risks. Many children are left unsupervised after the school day ends, but little is known about the association between unsupervised time and physical activity levels. This paper seeks to determine whether adolescent girls who are without adult supervision after school are more or less active than their peers who have a caregiver at home.METHODS:A random sample of girls from 36 middle schools at 6 field sites across the U.S. was selected during the fall of the 2002-2003 school year to participate in the baseline measurement activities of the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG). Information was collected using six-day objectively measured physical activity, self-reported physical activity using a three-day recall, and socioeconomic and psychosocial measures. Complete information was available for 1422 out of a total of 1596 respondents.Categorical variables were analyzed using chi square and continuous variables were analyzed by t-tests. The four categories of time alone were compared using a mixed linear model controlling for clustering effects by study center.RESULTS:Girls who spent more time after school (greater than or equal to]2 hours per day, greater than or equal to]2 days per week) without adult supervision were more active than those with adult supervision (p = 0.01). Girls alone for greater than or equal to]2 hours after school, greater than or equal to]2 days a week, on average accrue 7.55 minutes more moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day than do girls who are supervised (95% confidence interval (C.I]). These results adjusted for ethnicity, parent's education, participation in the free/reduced lunch program, neighborhood resources, or available transportation. Unsupervised girls (n = 279) did less homework (53.1% vs. 63.3%), spent less time riding in a car or bus (48.0% vs. 56.6%), talked on the phone more (35.5% vs. 21.1%), and watched more television (59.9% vs. 52.6%) than supervised girls (n = 569). However, unsupervised girls also were more likely to be dancing (14.0% vs. 9.3%) and listening to music (20.8% vs. 12.0%) (p < .05).CONCLUSION:Girls in an unsupervised environment engaged in fewer structured activities and did not immediately do their homework, but they were more likely to be physically active than supervised girls. These results may have implications for parents, school, and community agencies as to how to structure activities in order to encourage teenage girls to be more physically active.
EISSN:
1479-5868
DOI:
10.1186/1479-5868-3-20
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/3/1/20

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRushovich, Bereniceen
dc.contributor.authorVoorhees, Carolynen
dc.contributor.authorDavis, C. E.en
dc.contributor.authorNeumark-Sztainer, Dianneen
dc.contributor.authorPfeiffer, Karinen
dc.contributor.authorElder, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorGoing, Scotten
dc.contributor.authorMarino, Vivianen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T09:00:04Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T09:00:04Z-
dc.date.issued2006en
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 2006, 3:20 doi:10.1186/1479-5868-3-20en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1479-5868-3-20en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610163-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Rising obesity and declining physical activity levels are of great concern because of the associated health risks. Many children are left unsupervised after the school day ends, but little is known about the association between unsupervised time and physical activity levels. This paper seeks to determine whether adolescent girls who are without adult supervision after school are more or less active than their peers who have a caregiver at home.METHODS:A random sample of girls from 36 middle schools at 6 field sites across the U.S. was selected during the fall of the 2002-2003 school year to participate in the baseline measurement activities of the Trial of Activity for Adolescent Girls (TAAG). Information was collected using six-day objectively measured physical activity, self-reported physical activity using a three-day recall, and socioeconomic and psychosocial measures. Complete information was available for 1422 out of a total of 1596 respondents.Categorical variables were analyzed using chi square and continuous variables were analyzed by t-tests. The four categories of time alone were compared using a mixed linear model controlling for clustering effects by study center.RESULTS:Girls who spent more time after school (greater than or equal to]2 hours per day, greater than or equal to]2 days per week) without adult supervision were more active than those with adult supervision (p = 0.01). Girls alone for greater than or equal to]2 hours after school, greater than or equal to]2 days a week, on average accrue 7.55 minutes more moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day than do girls who are supervised (95% confidence interval (C.I]). These results adjusted for ethnicity, parent's education, participation in the free/reduced lunch program, neighborhood resources, or available transportation. Unsupervised girls (n = 279) did less homework (53.1% vs. 63.3%), spent less time riding in a car or bus (48.0% vs. 56.6%), talked on the phone more (35.5% vs. 21.1%), and watched more television (59.9% vs. 52.6%) than supervised girls (n = 569). However, unsupervised girls also were more likely to be dancing (14.0% vs. 9.3%) and listening to music (20.8% vs. 12.0%) (p < .05).CONCLUSION:Girls in an unsupervised environment engaged in fewer structured activities and did not immediately do their homework, but they were more likely to be physically active than supervised girls. These results may have implications for parents, school, and community agencies as to how to structure activities in order to encourage teenage girls to be more physically active.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ijbnpa.org/content/3/1/20en
dc.rights© 2006 Rushovich et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleThe relationship between unsupervised time after school and physical activity in adolescent girlsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1479-5868en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Public and Community Health, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biostatistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Exercise Science, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentGraduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Nutritional Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biostatistics, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, LA, USAen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activityen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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