Draft genome sequences of two Bifidobacterium sp. from the honey bee (Apis mellifera)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610155
Title:
Draft genome sequences of two Bifidobacterium sp. from the honey bee (Apis mellifera)
Author:
Anderson, Kirk; Johansson, Andreas; Sheehan, Tim; Mott, Brendon; Corby-Harris, Vanessa; Johnstone, Laurel; Sprissler, Ryan; Fitz, William
Affiliation:
Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, USDA-ARS, Tucson AZ 85719, USA; Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USA; National Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO14 3ZH, UK; Department of Microbiology, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USA; Bio5 Institute, University of Arizona Genomics Core, Tucson AZ 85721, USA
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Anderson et al. Gut Pathogens 2013, 5:42 http://www.gutpathogens.com/content/5/1/42
Journal:
Gut Pathogens
Rights:
© 2013 Anderson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Widely considered probiotic organisms, Bifidobacteria are common inhabitants of the alimentary tract of animals including insects. Bifidobacteria identified from the honey bee are found in larval guts and throughout the alimentary tract, but attain their greatest abundance in the adult hind gut. To further understand the role of Bifidobacteria in honey bees, we sequenced two strains of Bifidobacterium cultured from different alimentary tract environments and life stages.RESULTS:Reflecting an oxygen-rich niche, both strains possessed catalase, peroxidase, superoxide-dismutase and respiratory chain enzymes indicative of oxidative metabolism. The strains show markedly different carbohydrate processing capabilities, with one possessing auxiliary and key enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway.CONCLUSIONS:As a result of long term co-evolution, honey bee associated Bifidobacterium may harbor considerable strain diversity reflecting adaptation to a variety of different honey bee microenvironments and hive-mediated vertical transmission between generations.
EISSN:
1757-4749
DOI:
10.1186/1757-4749-5-42
Keywords:
Bifidobacterium; Probioiotic; Apis mellifera; Honey bee; Crop; Respiratory metabolic pathway; ROS tolerance
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.gutpathogens.com/content/5/1/42

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Kirken
dc.contributor.authorJohansson, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorSheehan, Timen
dc.contributor.authorMott, Brendonen
dc.contributor.authorCorby-Harris, Vanessaen
dc.contributor.authorJohnstone, Laurelen
dc.contributor.authorSprissler, Ryanen
dc.contributor.authorFitz, Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:59:50Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:59:50Z-
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationAnderson et al. Gut Pathogens 2013, 5:42 http://www.gutpathogens.com/content/5/1/42en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1757-4749-5-42en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610155-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Widely considered probiotic organisms, Bifidobacteria are common inhabitants of the alimentary tract of animals including insects. Bifidobacteria identified from the honey bee are found in larval guts and throughout the alimentary tract, but attain their greatest abundance in the adult hind gut. To further understand the role of Bifidobacteria in honey bees, we sequenced two strains of Bifidobacterium cultured from different alimentary tract environments and life stages.RESULTS:Reflecting an oxygen-rich niche, both strains possessed catalase, peroxidase, superoxide-dismutase and respiratory chain enzymes indicative of oxidative metabolism. The strains show markedly different carbohydrate processing capabilities, with one possessing auxiliary and key enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway.CONCLUSIONS:As a result of long term co-evolution, honey bee associated Bifidobacterium may harbor considerable strain diversity reflecting adaptation to a variety of different honey bee microenvironments and hive-mediated vertical transmission between generations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.gutpathogens.com/content/5/1/42en
dc.rights© 2013 Anderson et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectBifidobacteriumen
dc.subjectProbioioticen
dc.subjectApis melliferaen
dc.subjectHoney beeen
dc.subjectCropen
dc.subjectRespiratory metabolic pathwayen
dc.subjectROS toleranceen
dc.titleDraft genome sequences of two Bifidobacterium sp. from the honey bee (Apis mellifera)en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1757-4749en
dc.contributor.departmentCarl Hayden Bee Research Center, USDA-ARS, Tucson AZ 85719, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Oceanography Centre, University of Southampton, Southampton, SO14 3ZH, UKen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Microbiology, University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentBio5 Institute, University of Arizona Genomics Core, Tucson AZ 85721, USAen
dc.identifier.journalGut Pathogensen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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