Feasibility of exercising adults with asthma: a randomized pilot study

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610109
Title:
Feasibility of exercising adults with asthma: a randomized pilot study
Author:
Boyd, Amy; Yang, Celeste; Estell, Kim; Tuttle, Craig; Gerald, Lynn; Dransfield, Mark; Bamman, Marcas; Bonner, James; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Schwiebert, Lisa
Affiliation:
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USA; Department of Biostatistics, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USA; Department of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USA; The Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA; UAB Lung Health Center, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USA; Department of Medicine, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USA
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Boyd et al. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2012, 8:13 http://www.aacijournal.com/content/8/1/13
Journal:
Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology
Rights:
© 2012 Boyd et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Aerobic exercise appears to have clinical benefits for many asthmatics, yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms underlying these benefits has not been elucidated at this time.PURPOSE:The objective of this study was to determine feasibility for a larger, future study that will define the effect of aerobic exercise on cellular, molecular, and functional measures in adults with mild-moderate asthma.DESIGN:Recruited subjects were randomized into usual care (sedentary) or usual care with moderate intensity aerobic exercise treatment groups.SETTING / PARTICIPANTS:Nineteen adults with mild-moderate asthma but without a recent history of exercise were recruited at the UAB Lung Health Center, Birmingham, AL.INTERVENTION:The exercise group underwent a 12week walking program exercising at 60 - 75% of maximum heart rate (HRmax). Subjects self-monitored HRmax levels using heart rate monitors; exercise diaries and recreation center sign-in logs were also used.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Functional measures, including lung function and asthma control scores, were evaluated for all subjects at pre- and post-study time-points; fitness measures were also assessed for subjects in the exercise group. Peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid were collected from all subjects at pre- and post-study visits in order to evaluate cellular and molecular measures, including cell differentials and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP).RESULTS:Sixteen subjects completed the prescribed protocol. Results show that subjects randomized to the exercise group adhered well (80%) to the exercise prescription and exhibited a trend toward improved fitness levels upon study completion. Both groups exhibited improvements in ACQ scores. No changes were observed in lung function (FEV1, FEV1/FVC), cell differentials, or ECP between groups.CONCLUSIONS:Results indicate that a moderate intensity aerobic exercise training program may improve asthma control and fitness levels without causing asthma deterioration in adult asthmatics. As such, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of the study protocol in preparation for a larger, clinical trial that will elucidate the functional consequences of aerobic exercise on asthmatic cellular and molecular responses.
EISSN:
1710-1492
DOI:
10.1186/1710-1492-8-13
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.aacijournal.com/content/8/1/13

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoyd, Amyen
dc.contributor.authorYang, Celesteen
dc.contributor.authorEstell, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorTuttle, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorGerald, Lynnen
dc.contributor.authorDransfield, Marken
dc.contributor.authorBamman, Marcasen
dc.contributor.authorBonner, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, T. Prescotten
dc.contributor.authorSchwiebert, Lisaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:58:47Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:58:47Z-
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationBoyd et al. Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2012, 8:13 http://www.aacijournal.com/content/8/1/13en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1710-1492-8-13en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610109-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Aerobic exercise appears to have clinical benefits for many asthmatics, yet a complete understanding of the mechanisms underlying these benefits has not been elucidated at this time.PURPOSE:The objective of this study was to determine feasibility for a larger, future study that will define the effect of aerobic exercise on cellular, molecular, and functional measures in adults with mild-moderate asthma.DESIGN:Recruited subjects were randomized into usual care (sedentary) or usual care with moderate intensity aerobic exercise treatment groups.SETTING / PARTICIPANTS:Nineteen adults with mild-moderate asthma but without a recent history of exercise were recruited at the UAB Lung Health Center, Birmingham, AL.INTERVENTION:The exercise group underwent a 12week walking program exercising at 60 - 75% of maximum heart rate (HRmax). Subjects self-monitored HRmax levels using heart rate monitorsen
dc.description.abstractexercise diaries and recreation center sign-in logs were also used.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Functional measures, including lung function and asthma control scores, were evaluated for all subjects at pre- and post-study time-pointsen
dc.description.abstractfitness measures were also assessed for subjects in the exercise group. Peripheral blood and nasal lavage fluid were collected from all subjects at pre- and post-study visits in order to evaluate cellular and molecular measures, including cell differentials and eosinophilic cationic protein (ECP).RESULTS:Sixteen subjects completed the prescribed protocol. Results show that subjects randomized to the exercise group adhered well (80%) to the exercise prescription and exhibited a trend toward improved fitness levels upon study completion. Both groups exhibited improvements in ACQ scores. No changes were observed in lung function (FEV1, FEV1/FVC), cell differentials, or ECP between groups.CONCLUSIONS:Results indicate that a moderate intensity aerobic exercise training program may improve asthma control and fitness levels without causing asthma deterioration in adult asthmatics. As such, these findings demonstrate the feasibility of the study protocol in preparation for a larger, clinical trial that will elucidate the functional consequences of aerobic exercise on asthmatic cellular and molecular responses.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.aacijournal.com/content/8/1/13en
dc.rights© 2012 Boyd et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleFeasibility of exercising adults with asthma: a randomized pilot studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1710-1492en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Pediatrics, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biostatistics, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cell, Developmental, and Integrative Biology, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentUAB Lung Health Center, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medicine, University of Alabama, 1918 University Boulevard, Birmingham, AL, 35294-0005, USAen
dc.identifier.journalAllergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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