Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610082
Title:
Identification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte
Author:
Wang, Dongfang; Zhang, Changqing; Hearn, David; Kang, Il-Ho; Punwani, Jayson; Skaggs, Megan; Drews, Gary; Schumaker, Karen; Yadegari, Ramin
Affiliation:
School of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721-0036, USA; Department of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0840, USA; Current Address: The Section of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0159, USA; Current Address: Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Towson, Maryland 21252-0001, USA; Current Address: Department of Horticulture, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-1100, USA; Current Address: Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3280, USA
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Wang et al. BMC Plant Biology 2010, 10:110 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/10/110
Journal:
BMC Plant Biology
Rights:
© 2010 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte.RESULTS:Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm.CONCLUSIONS:We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this study have not been reported previously as being expressed in the female gametophyte. Therefore, they might represent novel regulators and provide entry points for reverse genetic and molecular approaches to uncover the gene regulatory networks underlying female gametophyte development.
EISSN:
1471-2229
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2229-10-110
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/10/110

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWang, Dongfangen
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Changqingen
dc.contributor.authorHearn, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorKang, Il-Hoen
dc.contributor.authorPunwani, Jaysonen
dc.contributor.authorSkaggs, Meganen
dc.contributor.authorDrews, Garyen
dc.contributor.authorSchumaker, Karenen
dc.contributor.authorYadegari, Raminen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:58:09Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:58:09Z-
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.citationWang et al. BMC Plant Biology 2010, 10:110 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/10/110en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2229-10-110en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610082-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:In flowering plants, the female gametophyte is typically a seven-celled structure with four cell types: the egg cell, the central cell, the synergid cells, and the antipodal cells. These cells perform essential functions required for double fertilization and early seed development. Differentiation of these distinct cell types likely involves coordinated changes in gene expression regulated by transcription factors. Therefore, understanding female gametophyte cell differentiation and function will require dissection of the gene regulatory networks operating in each of the cell types. These efforts have been hampered because few transcription factor genes expressed in the female gametophyte have been identified. To identify such genes, we undertook a large-scale differential expression screen followed by promoter-fusion analysis to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyte.RESULTS:Using quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR, we analyzed 1,482 Arabidopsis transcription-factor genes and identified 26 genes exhibiting reduced mRNA levels in determinate infertile 1 mutant ovaries, which lack female gametophytes, relative to ovaries containing female gametophytes. Spatial patterns of gene transcription within the mature female gametophyte were identified for 17 transcription-factor genes using promoter-fusion analysis. Of these, ten genes were predominantly expressed in a single cell type of the female gametophyte including the egg cell, central cell and the antipodal cells whereas the remaining seven genes were expressed in two or more cell types. After fertilization, 12 genes were transcriptionally active in the developing embryo and/or endosperm.CONCLUSIONS:We have shown that our quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR differential-expression screen is sufficiently sensitive to detect transcription-factor genes transcribed in the female gametophyte. Most of the genes identified in this study have not been reported previously as being expressed in the female gametophyte. Therefore, they might represent novel regulators and provide entry points for reverse genetic and molecular approaches to uncover the gene regulatory networks underlying female gametophyte development.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/10/110en
dc.rights© 2010 Wang et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleIdentification of transcription-factor genes expressed in the Arabidopsis female gametophyteen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2229en
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Plant Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721-0036, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0840, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentCurrent Address: The Section of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-0159, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentCurrent Address: Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Towson, Maryland 21252-0001, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentCurrent Address: Department of Horticulture, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011-1100, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentCurrent Address: Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3280, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Plant Biologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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