Spatial distribution of transcript changes in the maize primary root elongation zone at low water potential

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610081
Title:
Spatial distribution of transcript changes in the maize primary root elongation zone at low water potential
Author:
Spollen, William; Tao, Wenjing; Valliyodan, Babu; Chen, Kegui; Hejlek, Lindsey; Kim, Jong-Joo; LeNoble, Mary; Zhu, Jinming; Bohnert, Hans; Henderson, David; Schachtman, Daniel; Davis, Georgia; Springer, Gordon; Sharp, Robert; Nguyen, Henry
Affiliation:
Division of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA; Department of Animal Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; Department of Computer Science, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA; Department of Plant Biology and Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; W. M. Keck Center for Comparative and Functional Genomics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63132, USA; School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk, 712749 South Korea; Research Support Computing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USA; Bio-Rad Laboratories, 2000 Alfred Nobel Drive, Hercules, CA 94547, USA; School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk, 712749 South Korea; Insightful Corporation, Seattle, WA 98109, USA
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
BMC Plant Biology 2008, 8:32 doi:10.1186/1471-2229-8-32
Journal:
BMC Plant Biology
Rights:
© 2008 Spollen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Previous work showed that the maize primary root adapts to low Psiw (-1.6 MPa) by maintaining longitudinal expansion in the apical 3 mm (region 1), whereas in the adjacent 4 mm (region 2) longitudinal expansion reaches a maximum in well-watered roots but is progressively inhibited at low Psiw. To identify mechanisms that determine these responses to low Psiw, transcript expression was profiled in these regions of water-stressed and well-watered roots. In addition, comparison between region 2 of water-stressed roots and the zone of growth deceleration in well-watered roots (region 3) distinguished stress-responsive genes in region 2 from those involved in cell maturation.RESULTS:Responses of gene expression to water stress in regions 1 and 2 were largely distinct. The largest functional categories of differentially expressed transcripts were reactive oxygen species and carbon metabolism in region 1, and membrane transport in region 2. Transcripts controlling sucrose hydrolysis distinguished well-watered and water-stressed states (invertase vs. sucrose synthase), and changes in expression of transcripts for starch synthesis indicated further alteration in carbon metabolism under water deficit. A role for inositols in the stress response was suggested, as was control of proline metabolism. Increased expression of transcripts for wall-loosening proteins in region 1, and for elements of ABA and ethylene signaling were also indicated in the response to water deficit.CONCLUSION:The analysis indicates that fundamentally different signaling and metabolic response mechanisms are involved in the response to water stress in different regions of the maize primary root elongation zone.
EISSN:
1471-2229
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2229-8-32
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/8/32

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSpollen, Williamen
dc.contributor.authorTao, Wenjingen
dc.contributor.authorValliyodan, Babuen
dc.contributor.authorChen, Keguien
dc.contributor.authorHejlek, Lindseyen
dc.contributor.authorKim, Jong-Jooen
dc.contributor.authorLeNoble, Maryen
dc.contributor.authorZhu, Jinmingen
dc.contributor.authorBohnert, Hansen
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorSchachtman, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Georgiaen
dc.contributor.authorSpringer, Gordonen
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorNguyen, Henryen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:58:07Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:58:07Z-
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Plant Biology 2008, 8:32 doi:10.1186/1471-2229-8-32en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2229-8-32en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610081-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Previous work showed that the maize primary root adapts to low Psiw (-1.6 MPa) by maintaining longitudinal expansion in the apical 3 mm (region 1), whereas in the adjacent 4 mm (region 2) longitudinal expansion reaches a maximum in well-watered roots but is progressively inhibited at low Psiw. To identify mechanisms that determine these responses to low Psiw, transcript expression was profiled in these regions of water-stressed and well-watered roots. In addition, comparison between region 2 of water-stressed roots and the zone of growth deceleration in well-watered roots (region 3) distinguished stress-responsive genes in region 2 from those involved in cell maturation.RESULTS:Responses of gene expression to water stress in regions 1 and 2 were largely distinct. The largest functional categories of differentially expressed transcripts were reactive oxygen species and carbon metabolism in region 1, and membrane transport in region 2. Transcripts controlling sucrose hydrolysis distinguished well-watered and water-stressed states (invertase vs. sucrose synthase), and changes in expression of transcripts for starch synthesis indicated further alteration in carbon metabolism under water deficit. A role for inositols in the stress response was suggested, as was control of proline metabolism. Increased expression of transcripts for wall-loosening proteins in region 1, and for elements of ABA and ethylene signaling were also indicated in the response to water deficit.CONCLUSION:The analysis indicates that fundamentally different signaling and metabolic response mechanisms are involved in the response to water stress in different regions of the maize primary root elongation zone.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2229/8/32en
dc.rights© 2008 Spollen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleSpatial distribution of transcript changes in the maize primary root elongation zone at low water potentialen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2229en
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Plant Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Animal Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Computer Science, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Plant Biology and Department of Crop Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentW. M. Keck Center for Comparative and Functional Genomics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDonald Danforth Plant Science Center, St. Louis, Missouri 63132, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk, 712749 South Koreaen
dc.contributor.departmentResearch Support Computing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentBio-Rad Laboratories, 2000 Alfred Nobel Drive, Hercules, CA 94547, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk, 712749 South Koreaen
dc.contributor.departmentInsightful Corporation, Seattle, WA 98109, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Plant Biologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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