Experience-dependent persistent expression of zif268 during rest is preserved in the aged dentate gyrus

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610073
Title:
Experience-dependent persistent expression of zif268 during rest is preserved in the aged dentate gyrus
Author:
Gheidi, Ali; Azzopardi, Erin; Adams, Allison; Marrone, Diano
Affiliation:
Department of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5, Canada; McKnight Brain Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Gheidi et al. BMC Neuroscience 2013, 14:100 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/14/100
Journal:
BMC Neuroscience
Rights:
© 2013 Gheidi et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Aging is typically accompanied by memory decline and changes in hippocampal function. Among these changes is a decline in the activity of the dentate gyrus (DG) during behavior. Lasting memory, however, is thought to also require recapitulation of recent memory traces during subsequent rest - a phenomenon, termed memory trace reactivation, which is compromised in hippocampal CA1 with progressive age. This process has yet to be assessed in the aged DG, despite its prominent role in age-related memory impairment. Using zif268 transcription to measure granule cell recruitment, DG activity in adult and aged animals was assessed both during spatial exploration and as animals remained at rest in the home cage in order to detect potential memory-related replay.RESULTS:Consistent with the observation of memory trace reactivation in DG, the probability that an individual granule cell transcribes zif268 during rest in the animal's home cage is increased by recent experience in a novel environment. Surprisingly, a comparable increase was observed in the probability of granule cells in the aged DG expressing zif268 during rest. Moreover, no significant age-related difference was observed in the number of granule cells expressing zif268 during rest. Thus, the number and pattern of granule cell expression of zif268 during rest is preserved in aged animals, despite a significant decline in exploration-related zif268 expression.CONCLUSIONS:These data lead to the hypothesis that the input the aged DG receives from backprojections from CA3 (the region widely hypothesized to mediate reactivation) remains functionally intact despite loss of innervation from the perforant path.
EISSN:
1471-2202
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2202-14-100
Keywords:
Fascia dentata; egr1; ngfi-a; Reactivation; Replay; Granule cell; IEG; Hippocampus
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/14/100

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGheidi, Alien
dc.contributor.authorAzzopardi, Erinen
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Allisonen
dc.contributor.authorMarrone, Dianoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:57:57Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:57:57Z-
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationGheidi et al. BMC Neuroscience 2013, 14:100 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/14/100en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2202-14-100en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610073-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Aging is typically accompanied by memory decline and changes in hippocampal function. Among these changes is a decline in the activity of the dentate gyrus (DG) during behavior. Lasting memory, however, is thought to also require recapitulation of recent memory traces during subsequent rest - a phenomenon, termed memory trace reactivation, which is compromised in hippocampal CA1 with progressive age. This process has yet to be assessed in the aged DG, despite its prominent role in age-related memory impairment. Using zif268 transcription to measure granule cell recruitment, DG activity in adult and aged animals was assessed both during spatial exploration and as animals remained at rest in the home cage in order to detect potential memory-related replay.RESULTS:Consistent with the observation of memory trace reactivation in DG, the probability that an individual granule cell transcribes zif268 during rest in the animal's home cage is increased by recent experience in a novel environment. Surprisingly, a comparable increase was observed in the probability of granule cells in the aged DG expressing zif268 during rest. Moreover, no significant age-related difference was observed in the number of granule cells expressing zif268 during rest. Thus, the number and pattern of granule cell expression of zif268 during rest is preserved in aged animals, despite a significant decline in exploration-related zif268 expression.CONCLUSIONS:These data lead to the hypothesis that the input the aged DG receives from backprojections from CA3 (the region widely hypothesized to mediate reactivation) remains functionally intact despite loss of innervation from the perforant path.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2202/14/100en
dc.rights© 2013 Gheidi et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectFascia dentataen
dc.subjectegr1en
dc.subjectngfi-aen
dc.subjectReactivationen
dc.subjectReplayen
dc.subjectGranule cellen
dc.subjectIEGen
dc.subjectHippocampusen
dc.titleExperience-dependent persistent expression of zif268 during rest is preserved in the aged dentate gyrusen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2202en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychology, Wilfrid Laurier University, 75 University Ave W, Waterloo, ON N2L 3C5, Canadaen
dc.contributor.departmentMcKnight Brain Institute, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85724, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Neuroscienceen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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