International Clostridium difficile animal strain collection and large diversity of animal associated strains

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610058
Title:
International Clostridium difficile animal strain collection and large diversity of animal associated strains
Author:
Janezic, Sandra; Zidaric, Valerija; Pardon, Bart; Indra, Alexander; Kokotovic, Branko; Blanco, Jose; Seyboldt, Christian; Diaz, Cristina; Poxton, Ian; Perreten, Vincent; Drigo, Ilenia; Jiraskova, Alena; Ocepek, Matjaz; Weese, J.; Songer, J.; Wilcox, Mark; Rupnik, Maja
Affiliation:
National Laboratory for Health, Environment and Food, Maribor, Slovenia; Department of Large Animal Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgium; Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES), Vienna, Austria; Technical University of Denmark, National Veterinary Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark; Complutense University, Madrid, Spain; Friedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Jena, Germany; University of Liege, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Liege, Belgium; University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; University of Bern, Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Bern, Switzerland; IZSVe, Treviso, Italy; Charles University in Prague, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic; University of Ljubljana, Veterinary Faculty, Ljubljana, Slovenia; University of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College, Ontario, Canada; Department of Veterinary Science and Microbiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, USA; Department of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Leeds, UK; University of Maribor, Medical Faculty, Maribor, Slovenia; Centre of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, Ljubljana, Slovenia
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Janezic et al. BMC Microbiology 2014, 14:173 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/14/173
Journal:
BMC Microbiology
Rights:
© 2014 Janezic et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Clostridium difficile is an important cause of intestinal infections in some animal species and animals might be a reservoir for community associated human infections. Here we describe a collection of animal associated C. difficile strains from 12 countries based on inclusion criteria of one strain (PCR ribotype) per animal species per laboratory.RESULTS:Altogether 112 isolates were collected and distributed into 38 PCR ribotypes with agarose based approach and 50 PCR ribotypes with sequencer based approach. Four PCR ribotypes were most prevalent in terms of number of isolates as well as in terms of number of different host species: 078 (14.3% of isolates; 4 hosts), 014/020 (11.6%; 8 hosts); 002 (5.4%; 4 hosts) and 012 (5.4%; 5 hosts). Two animal hosts were best represented; cattle with 31 isolates (20 PCR ribotypes; 7 countries) and pigs with 31 isolates (16 PCR ribotypes; 10 countries).CONCLUSIONS:This results show that although PCR ribotype 078 is often reported as the major animal C. difficile type, especially in pigs, the variability of strains in pigs and other animal hosts is substantial. Most common human PCR ribotypes (014/020 and 002) are also among most prevalent animal associated C. difficile strains worldwide. The widespread dissemination of toxigenic C. difficile and the considerable overlap in strain distribution between species furthers concerns about interspecies, including zoonotic, transmission of this critically important pathogen.
EISSN:
1471-2180
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2180-14-173
Keywords:
Clostridium difficile; Animals; Ribotyping; Geographic distribution; Strain collection
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/14/173

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJanezic, Sandraen
dc.contributor.authorZidaric, Valerijaen
dc.contributor.authorPardon, Barten
dc.contributor.authorIndra, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorKokotovic, Brankoen
dc.contributor.authorBlanco, Joseen
dc.contributor.authorSeyboldt, Christianen
dc.contributor.authorDiaz, Cristinaen
dc.contributor.authorPoxton, Ianen
dc.contributor.authorPerreten, Vincenten
dc.contributor.authorDrigo, Ileniaen
dc.contributor.authorJiraskova, Alenaen
dc.contributor.authorOcepek, Matjazen
dc.contributor.authorWeese, J.en
dc.contributor.authorSonger, J.en
dc.contributor.authorWilcox, Marken
dc.contributor.authorRupnik, Majaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:57:36Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:57:36Z-
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationJanezic et al. BMC Microbiology 2014, 14:173 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/14/173en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2180-14-173en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610058-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Clostridium difficile is an important cause of intestinal infections in some animal species and animals might be a reservoir for community associated human infections. Here we describe a collection of animal associated C. difficile strains from 12 countries based on inclusion criteria of one strain (PCR ribotype) per animal species per laboratory.RESULTS:Altogether 112 isolates were collected and distributed into 38 PCR ribotypes with agarose based approach and 50 PCR ribotypes with sequencer based approach. Four PCR ribotypes were most prevalent in terms of number of isolates as well as in terms of number of different host species: 078 (14.3% of isolatesen
dc.description.abstract4 hosts), 014/020 (11.6%en
dc.description.abstract8 hosts)en
dc.description.abstract002 (5.4%en
dc.description.abstract4 hosts) and 012 (5.4%en
dc.description.abstract5 hosts). Two animal hosts were best representeden
dc.description.abstractcattle with 31 isolates (20 PCR ribotypesen
dc.description.abstract7 countries) and pigs with 31 isolates (16 PCR ribotypesen
dc.description.abstract10 countries).CONCLUSIONS:This results show that although PCR ribotype 078 is often reported as the major animal C. difficile type, especially in pigs, the variability of strains in pigs and other animal hosts is substantial. Most common human PCR ribotypes (014/020 and 002) are also among most prevalent animal associated C. difficile strains worldwide. The widespread dissemination of toxigenic C. difficile and the considerable overlap in strain distribution between species furthers concerns about interspecies, including zoonotic, transmission of this critically important pathogen.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2180/14/173en
dc.rights© 2014 Janezic et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0)en
dc.subjectClostridium difficileen
dc.subjectAnimalsen
dc.subjectRibotypingen
dc.subjectGeographic distributionen
dc.subjectStrain collectionen
dc.titleInternational Clostridium difficile animal strain collection and large diversity of animal associated strainsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2180en
dc.contributor.departmentNational Laboratory for Health, Environment and Food, Maribor, Sloveniaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Large Animal Internal Medicine, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ghent University, Merelbeke, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.departmentAustrian Agency for Health and Food Safety (AGES), Vienna, Austriaen
dc.contributor.departmentTechnical University of Denmark, National Veterinary Institute, Copenhagen, Denmarken
dc.contributor.departmentComplutense University, Madrid, Spainen
dc.contributor.departmentFriedrich-Loeffler-Institut, Federal Research Institute for Animal Health, Institute of Bacterial Infections and Zoonoses, Jena, Germanyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Liege, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Liege, Belgiumen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UKen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bern, Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology, Bern, Switzerlanden
dc.contributor.departmentIZSVe, Treviso, Italyen
dc.contributor.departmentCharles University in Prague, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Prague, Czech Republicen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Ljubljana, Veterinary Faculty, Ljubljana, Sloveniaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Guelph, Ontario Veterinary College, Ontario, Canadaen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Veterinary Science and Microbiology, University of Arizona, Tucson, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Microbiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals, Leeds, UKen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Maribor, Medical Faculty, Maribor, Sloveniaen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre of Excellence for Integrated Approaches in Chemistry and Biology of Proteins, Ljubljana, Sloveniaen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Microbiologyen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.