Novel mouse mammary cell lines for in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of bone metastasis

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610032
Title:
Novel mouse mammary cell lines for in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of bone metastasis
Author:
Bolin, Celeste; Sutherland, Caleb; Tawara, Ken; Moselhy, Jim; Jorcyk, Cheryl
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID, USA; Present Address: Department of Cancer Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA
Issue Date:
2012
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Bolin et al. Biological Procedures Online 2012, 14:6 http://www.biologicalproceduresonline.com/content/14/1/6
Journal:
Biological Procedures Online
Rights:
© 2012 Bolin et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Tumor cell lines that can be tracked in vivo during tumorigenesis and metastasis provide vital tools for studying the specific cellular mechanisms that mediate these processes as well as investigating therapeutic targets to inhibit them. The goal of this study was to engineer imageable mouse mammary tumor cell lines with discrete propensities to metastasize to bone in vivo. Two novel luciferase expressing cell lines were developed and characterized for use in the study of breast cancer metastasis to bone in a syngeneic mouse model.RESULTS:The 4 T1.2 luc3 and 66c14 luc2 cell lines were shown to have high levels of bioluminescence intensity in vitro and in vivo after orthotopic injection into mouse mammary fat pads. The 4 T1.2 luc3 cell line was found to closely model the sites of metastases seen in human patients including lung, liver, and bone. Specifically, 4 T1.2 luc3 cells demonstrated a high incidence of metastasis to spine, with an ex-vivo BLI intensity three orders of magnitude above the commercially available 4 T1 luc2 cells. 66c14 luc2 cells also demonstrated metastasis to spine, which was lower than that of 4 T1.2 luc3 cells but higher than 4 T1 luc2 cells, in addition to previously unreported metastases in the liver. High osteolytic activity of the 4 T1.2 luc3 cells in vivo in the bone microenvironment was also detected.CONCLUSIONS:The engineered 4 T1.2 luc3 and 66c14 luc2 cell lines described in this study are valuable tools for studying the cellular events moderating the metastasis of breast tumor cells to bone.
EISSN:
1480-9222
DOI:
10.1186/1480-9222-14-6
Keywords:
Breast cancer; Mammary cancer; Bone metastasis; in vivo imaging; 4 T1 cells; 4 T1.2 cells; Osteolysis; Syngeneic Balb/c model
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biologicalproceduresonline.com/content/14/1/6

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBolin, Celesteen
dc.contributor.authorSutherland, Caleben
dc.contributor.authorTawara, Kenen
dc.contributor.authorMoselhy, Jimen
dc.contributor.authorJorcyk, Cherylen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:56:59Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:56:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationBolin et al. Biological Procedures Online 2012, 14:6 http://www.biologicalproceduresonline.com/content/14/1/6en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1480-9222-14-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610032-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Tumor cell lines that can be tracked in vivo during tumorigenesis and metastasis provide vital tools for studying the specific cellular mechanisms that mediate these processes as well as investigating therapeutic targets to inhibit them. The goal of this study was to engineer imageable mouse mammary tumor cell lines with discrete propensities to metastasize to bone in vivo. Two novel luciferase expressing cell lines were developed and characterized for use in the study of breast cancer metastasis to bone in a syngeneic mouse model.RESULTS:The 4 T1.2 luc3 and 66c14 luc2 cell lines were shown to have high levels of bioluminescence intensity in vitro and in vivo after orthotopic injection into mouse mammary fat pads. The 4 T1.2 luc3 cell line was found to closely model the sites of metastases seen in human patients including lung, liver, and bone. Specifically, 4 T1.2 luc3 cells demonstrated a high incidence of metastasis to spine, with an ex-vivo BLI intensity three orders of magnitude above the commercially available 4 T1 luc2 cells. 66c14 luc2 cells also demonstrated metastasis to spine, which was lower than that of 4 T1.2 luc3 cells but higher than 4 T1 luc2 cells, in addition to previously unreported metastases in the liver. High osteolytic activity of the 4 T1.2 luc3 cells in vivo in the bone microenvironment was also detected.CONCLUSIONS:The engineered 4 T1.2 luc3 and 66c14 luc2 cell lines described in this study are valuable tools for studying the cellular events moderating the metastasis of breast tumor cells to bone.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biologicalproceduresonline.com/content/14/1/6en
dc.rights© 2012 Bolin et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectBreast canceren
dc.subjectMammary canceren
dc.subjectBone metastasisen
dc.subjectin vivo imagingen
dc.subject4 T1 cellsen
dc.subject4 T1.2 cellsen
dc.subjectOsteolysisen
dc.subjectSyngeneic Balb/c modelen
dc.titleNovel mouse mammary cell lines for in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of bone metastasisen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1480-9222en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Biological Sciences, Boise State University, Boise, ID, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentPresent Address: Department of Cancer Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBiological Procedures Onlineen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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