Transcriptional markers of sub-optimal nutrition in developing Apis mellifera nurse workers

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610028
Title:
Transcriptional markers of sub-optimal nutrition in developing Apis mellifera nurse workers
Author:
Corby-Harris, Vanessa; Jones, Beryl; Walton, Alexander; Schwan, Melissa; Anderson, Kirk
Affiliation:
Carl Hayden Bee Research Center, USDA Agricultural Research Service, 2000 E. Allen Road, Tucson, Arizona 85719, USA; Department of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA; Current address: Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA; Current address: Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA
Issue Date:
2014
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Corby-Harris et al. BMC Genomics 2014, 15:134 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/15/134
Journal:
BMC Genomics
Rights:
© 2014 Corby-Harris et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Honey bees (Apis mellifera) contribute substantially to the worldwide economy and ecosystem health as pollinators. Pollen is essential to the bee's diet, providing protein, lipids, and micronutrients. The dramatic shifts in physiology, anatomy, and behavior that accompany normal worker development are highly plastic and recent work demonstrates that development, particularly the transition from nurse to foraging roles, is greatly impacted by diet. However, the role that diet plays in the developmental transition of newly eclosed bees to nurse workers is poorly understood. To further understand honey bee nutrition and the role of diet in nurse development, we used a high-throughput screen of the transcriptome of 3day and 8day old worker bees fed either honey and stored pollen (rich diet) or honey alone (poor diet) within the hive. We employed a three factor (age, diet, age x diet) analysis of the transcriptome to determine whether diet affected nurse worker physiology and whether poor diet altered the developmental processes normally associated with aging.RESULTS:Substantial changes in gene expression occurred due to starvation. Diet-induced changes in gene transcription occurring in younger bees were largely a subset of those occurring in older bees, but certain signatures of starvation were only evident 8day old workers. Of the 18,542 annotated transcripts in the A. mellifera genome, 150 transcripts exhibited differential expression due to poor diet at 3d of age compared with 17,226 transcripts that differed due to poor diet at 8d of age, and poor diet caused more frequent down-regulation of gene expression in younger bees compared to older bees. In addition, the age-related physiological changes that accompanied early adult development differed due to the diet these young adult bees were fed. More frequent down-regulation of gene expression was observed in developing bees fed a poor diet compared to those fed an adequate diet. Functional analyses also suggest that the physiological and developmental processes occurring in well-fed bees are vastly different than those occurring in pollen deprived bees. Our data support the hypothesis that poor diet causes normal age-related development to go awry.CONCLUSION:Poor nutrition has major consequences for the expression of genes underlying the physiology and age-related development of nurse worker bees. More work is certainly needed to fully understand the consequences of starvation and the complex biology of nutrition and development in this system, but the genes identified in the present study provide a starting point for understanding the consequences of poor diet and for mitigating the economic costs of colony starvation.
EISSN:
1471-2164
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2164-15-134
Keywords:
Transcriptome; Apis mellifera; Nutrition; Starvation; Nurse; Development; Physiology
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/15/134

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCorby-Harris, Vanessaen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Berylen
dc.contributor.authorWalton, Alexanderen
dc.contributor.authorSchwan, Melissaen
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Kirken
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:56:53Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:56:53Z-
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationCorby-Harris et al. BMC Genomics 2014, 15:134 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/15/134en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2164-15-134en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610028-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Honey bees (Apis mellifera) contribute substantially to the worldwide economy and ecosystem health as pollinators. Pollen is essential to the bee's diet, providing protein, lipids, and micronutrients. The dramatic shifts in physiology, anatomy, and behavior that accompany normal worker development are highly plastic and recent work demonstrates that development, particularly the transition from nurse to foraging roles, is greatly impacted by diet. However, the role that diet plays in the developmental transition of newly eclosed bees to nurse workers is poorly understood. To further understand honey bee nutrition and the role of diet in nurse development, we used a high-throughput screen of the transcriptome of 3day and 8day old worker bees fed either honey and stored pollen (rich diet) or honey alone (poor diet) within the hive. We employed a three factor (age, diet, age x diet) analysis of the transcriptome to determine whether diet affected nurse worker physiology and whether poor diet altered the developmental processes normally associated with aging.RESULTS:Substantial changes in gene expression occurred due to starvation. Diet-induced changes in gene transcription occurring in younger bees were largely a subset of those occurring in older bees, but certain signatures of starvation were only evident 8day old workers. Of the 18,542 annotated transcripts in the A. mellifera genome, 150 transcripts exhibited differential expression due to poor diet at 3d of age compared with 17,226 transcripts that differed due to poor diet at 8d of age, and poor diet caused more frequent down-regulation of gene expression in younger bees compared to older bees. In addition, the age-related physiological changes that accompanied early adult development differed due to the diet these young adult bees were fed. More frequent down-regulation of gene expression was observed in developing bees fed a poor diet compared to those fed an adequate diet. Functional analyses also suggest that the physiological and developmental processes occurring in well-fed bees are vastly different than those occurring in pollen deprived bees. Our data support the hypothesis that poor diet causes normal age-related development to go awry.CONCLUSION:Poor nutrition has major consequences for the expression of genes underlying the physiology and age-related development of nurse worker bees. More work is certainly needed to fully understand the consequences of starvation and the complex biology of nutrition and development in this system, but the genes identified in the present study provide a starting point for understanding the consequences of poor diet and for mitigating the economic costs of colony starvation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/15/134en
dc.rights© 2014 Corby-Harris et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.subjectTranscriptomeen
dc.subjectApis melliferaen
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectStarvationen
dc.subjectNurseen
dc.subjectDevelopmenten
dc.subjectPhysiologyen
dc.titleTranscriptional markers of sub-optimal nutrition in developing Apis mellifera nurse workersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2164en
dc.contributor.departmentCarl Hayden Bee Research Center, USDA Agricultural Research Service, 2000 E. Allen Road, Tucson, Arizona 85719, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Entomology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentCurrent address: Program in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentCurrent address: Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Genomicsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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