The Giardia lamblia vsp gene repertoire: characteristics, genomic organization, and evolution

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610013
Title:
The Giardia lamblia vsp gene repertoire: characteristics, genomic organization, and evolution
Author:
Adam, Rodney; Nigam, Anuranjini; Seshadri, Vishwas; Martens, Craig; Farneth, Gregory; Morrison, Hilary; Nash, Theodore; Porcella, Stephen; Patel, Rima
Affiliation:
Departments of Medicine and Immunobiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; Dept of Immunobiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; Genomics Unit, Research Technologies Section, RTB, NIAID, NIH, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT, USA; Josephine Bay Paul Center, MBL, Woods Hole, MA, USA; Laboratory of Parasitic Diseases, NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; Dept of Immunobiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA
Issue Date:
2010
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
Adam et al. BMC Genomics 2010, 11:424 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/424
Journal:
BMC Genomics
Rights:
© 2010 Adam et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Giardia lamblia trophozoites colonize the intestines of susceptible mammals and cause diarrhea, which can be prolonged despite an intestinal immune response. The variable expression of the variant-specific surface protein (VSP) genes may contribute to this prolonged infection. Only one is expressed at a time, and switching expression from one gene to another occurs by an epigenetic mechanism.RESULTS:The WB Giardia isolate has been sequenced at 10x coverage and assembled into 306 contigs as large as 870 kb in size. We have used this assembly to evaluate the genomic organization and evolution of the vsp repertoire. We have identified 228 complete and 75 partial vsp gene sequences for an estimated repertoire of 270 to 303, making up about 4% of the genome. The vsp gene diversity includes 30 genes containing tandem repeats, and 14 vsp pairs of identical genes present in either head to head or tail to tail configurations (designated as inverted pairs), where the two genes are separated by 2 to 4 kb of non-coding DNA. Interestingly, over half the total vsp repertoire is present in the form of linear gene arrays that can contain up to 10 vsp gene members. Lastly, evidence for recombination within and across minor clades of vsp genes is provided.CONCLUSIONS:The data we present here is the first comprehensive analysis of the vsp gene family from the Genotype A1 WB isolate with an emphasis on vsp characterization, function, evolution and contributions to pathogenesis of this important pathogen.
EISSN:
1471-2164
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2164-11-424
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/424

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAdam, Rodneyen
dc.contributor.authorNigam, Anuranjinien
dc.contributor.authorSeshadri, Vishwasen
dc.contributor.authorMartens, Craigen
dc.contributor.authorFarneth, Gregoryen
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Hilaryen
dc.contributor.authorNash, Theodoreen
dc.contributor.authorPorcella, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Rimaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:56:28Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:56:28Z-
dc.date.issued2010en
dc.identifier.citationAdam et al. BMC Genomics 2010, 11:424 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/424en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2164-11-424en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610013-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Giardia lamblia trophozoites colonize the intestines of susceptible mammals and cause diarrhea, which can be prolonged despite an intestinal immune response. The variable expression of the variant-specific surface protein (VSP) genes may contribute to this prolonged infection. Only one is expressed at a time, and switching expression from one gene to another occurs by an epigenetic mechanism.RESULTS:The WB Giardia isolate has been sequenced at 10x coverage and assembled into 306 contigs as large as 870 kb in size. We have used this assembly to evaluate the genomic organization and evolution of the vsp repertoire. We have identified 228 complete and 75 partial vsp gene sequences for an estimated repertoire of 270 to 303, making up about 4% of the genome. The vsp gene diversity includes 30 genes containing tandem repeats, and 14 vsp pairs of identical genes present in either head to head or tail to tail configurations (designated as inverted pairs), where the two genes are separated by 2 to 4 kb of non-coding DNA. Interestingly, over half the total vsp repertoire is present in the form of linear gene arrays that can contain up to 10 vsp gene members. Lastly, evidence for recombination within and across minor clades of vsp genes is provided.CONCLUSIONS:The data we present here is the first comprehensive analysis of the vsp gene family from the Genotype A1 WB isolate with an emphasis on vsp characterization, function, evolution and contributions to pathogenesis of this important pathogen.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/11/424en
dc.rights© 2010 Adam et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleThe Giardia lamblia vsp gene repertoire: characteristics, genomic organization, and evolutionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2164en
dc.contributor.departmentDepartments of Medicine and Immunobiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDept of Immunobiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentGenomics Unit, Research Technologies Section, RTB, NIAID, NIH, Rocky Mountain Laboratories, Hamilton, MT, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentJosephine Bay Paul Center, MBL, Woods Hole, MA, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentLaboratory of Parasitic Diseases, NIAID, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USAen
dc.contributor.departmentDept of Immunobiology, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Genomicsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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