Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/610002
Title:
Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions
Author:
Lambou, Karine; Tharreau, Didier; Kohler, Annegret; Sirven, Catherine; Marguerettaz, Melanie; Barbisan, Crystel; Sexton, Adrienne; Kellner, Ellen; Martin, Francis; Howlett, Barbara; Orbach, Marc; Lebrun, Marc-Henri
Affiliation:
UMR 5240 CNRS-UCB-INSA-Bayer CropScience, Microbiologie, Adaptation et Pathogénie, Bayer CropScience, 14-20 rue Pierre Baizet, 69263 Lyon Cedex 09, France; UMR BGPI, CIRAD-INRA-SupAgro.M, TA A 54/K, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, France; UMR INRA/Université Henri Poincaré 1136, Interactions Arbres/Micro-organismes, Centre INRA de Nancy, 54280 Champenoux, France; Bayer CropScience AG, Alfred Nobel Strasse 50, 40789 Monheim am Rhein, Germany; School of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia; University of Arizona, 303 Forbes Building, P.O. Box 210036, Tucson, AZ 85721-0036, USA
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Citation:
BMC Genomics 2008, 9:63 doi:10.1186/1471-2164-9-63
Journal:
BMC Genomics
Rights:
© 2008 Lambou et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)
Collection Information:
This item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND:Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3) and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1) in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea.RESULTS:The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes) contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3) with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1) was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Deltatsp3 and Deltatpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Deltapls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice.CONCLUSION:A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3) and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1) have been identified in fungi. Functional analysis by gene replacement showed that these proteins, as well as Pls1, are involved in the infection process of the plant pathogenic fungus M. grisea. The next challenge will be to decipher the role(s) of tetraspanins in a range of symbiotic, saprophytic and human pathogenic fungi.
EISSN:
1471-2164
DOI:
10.1186/1471-2164-9-63
Version:
Final published version
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/9/63

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLambou, Karineen
dc.contributor.authorTharreau, Didieren
dc.contributor.authorKohler, Annegreten
dc.contributor.authorSirven, Catherineen
dc.contributor.authorMarguerettaz, Melanieen
dc.contributor.authorBarbisan, Crystelen
dc.contributor.authorSexton, Adrienneen
dc.contributor.authorKellner, Ellenen
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Francisen
dc.contributor.authorHowlett, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.authorOrbach, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorLebrun, Marc-Henrien
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-20T08:56:08Z-
dc.date.available2016-05-20T08:56:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Genomics 2008, 9:63 doi:10.1186/1471-2164-9-63en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2164-9-63en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/610002-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND:Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3) and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1) in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea.RESULTS:The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes) contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3) with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1) was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Deltatsp3 and Deltatpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Deltapls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice.CONCLUSION:A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3) and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1) have been identified in fungi. Functional analysis by gene replacement showed that these proteins, as well as Pls1, are involved in the infection process of the plant pathogenic fungus M. grisea. The next challenge will be to decipher the role(s) of tetraspanins in a range of symbiotic, saprophytic and human pathogenic fungi.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2164/9/63en
dc.rights© 2008 Lambou et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)en
dc.titleFungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2164en
dc.contributor.departmentUMR 5240 CNRS-UCB-INSA-Bayer CropScience, Microbiologie, Adaptation et Pathogénie, Bayer CropScience, 14-20 rue Pierre Baizet, 69263 Lyon Cedex 09, Franceen
dc.contributor.departmentUMR BGPI, CIRAD-INRA-SupAgro.M, TA A 54/K, Campus International de Baillarguet, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, Franceen
dc.contributor.departmentUMR INRA/Université Henri Poincaré 1136, Interactions Arbres/Micro-organismes, Centre INRA de Nancy, 54280 Champenoux, Franceen
dc.contributor.departmentBayer CropScience AG, Alfred Nobel Strasse 50, 40789 Monheim am Rhein, Germanyen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Botany, The University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australiaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Arizona, 303 Forbes Building, P.O. Box 210036, Tucson, AZ 85721-0036, USAen
dc.identifier.journalBMC Genomicsen
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the UA Faculty Publications collection. For more information this item or other items in the UA Campus Repository, contact the University of Arizona Libraries at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen
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